Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

NASA Selects First Concepts In Revolutionary Aeronautics Project

Date:
September 2, 1999
Source:
National Aeronautics And Space Administration
Summary:
NASA has selected three advanced aeronautical concepts as quick starts in its Revolutionary Concepts (REVCON) project, which encourages the development of ideas that could lead to revolutionary experimental planes.

NASA has selected three advanced aeronautical concepts as quick starts in its Revolutionary Concepts (REVCON) project, which encourages the development of ideas that could lead to revolutionary experimental planes.

Related Articles


The selected concepts are AeroCraft, a piloted, partially buoyant airship; the Blended Wing Body, a powered, remotely piloted, flying wing configuration; and the Pulse Detonation Engine, a design geared toward lower maintenance and operations costs.

AeroCraft could dramatically improve cargo transportation. It is designed to serve the market that requires transportation faster than ocean freight but cheaper than airfreight. Project partners are the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, CA, NASA's Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA, and MicroCraft, Tullahoma, TN. Lockheed Martin Skunkworks, Palmdale, CA, and American Blimp Company, Hillsboro, OR, have supporting roles. Proposed flight experiments will be conducted on a scale model of AeroCraft at Dryden in 2001. Total funding is $10 million.

The Blended Wing Body research aircraft may improve fuel efficiency, maximum takeoff weight and direct operating costs for commercial carriers, which in turn could translate into lower costs for airline customers.

The project is a partnership between NASA's Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA, Dryden, Ames and Boeing Phantom Works, Long Beach, CA. First flight at Dryden is scheduled for 2002. Total funding is $1.5 million.

The Pulse Detonation Engine is a revolutionary approach for future high-speed jet propulsion. This engine design will provide higher propulsion efficiency and simplicity using significantly fewer parts, resulting in lower maintenance and direct operating costs. The engine will be tested in a wind tunnel at NASA's Glenn Research Center, Cleveland, OH. At Dryden, the system will be flown on NASA research aircraft. Eventually it will be attached to an SR-71 Blackbird aircraft and fired to a speed of Mach 3. In addition to Glenn, Dryden is also a project partner. The live fire tests for the $9.6-million project will take place in 2002.

The three concepts will become the first element of the project to use the ongoing flight research program led Dryden to develop revolutionary aeronautical concepts. The project also seeks to advance traditional approaches to aerospace technology and create methods to reduce development and certification time for new aircraft and flight systems.

As these projects work through the early phases of development, NASA's Office of Aero-Space Technology will issue a NASA Research Announcement to solicit new ideas for future REVCON selections. The Dryden Flight Research Center is the lead center for the REVCON project.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by National Aeronautics And Space Administration. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

National Aeronautics And Space Administration. "NASA Selects First Concepts In Revolutionary Aeronautics Project." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 2 September 1999. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1999/09/990902080431.htm>.
National Aeronautics And Space Administration. (1999, September 2). NASA Selects First Concepts In Revolutionary Aeronautics Project. ScienceDaily. Retrieved November 26, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1999/09/990902080431.htm
National Aeronautics And Space Administration. "NASA Selects First Concepts In Revolutionary Aeronautics Project." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1999/09/990902080431.htm (accessed November 26, 2014).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Matter & Energy News

Wednesday, November 26, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Who Will Failed Nuclear Talks Hurt Most?

Who Will Failed Nuclear Talks Hurt Most?

Reuters - Business Video Online (Nov. 25, 2014) With no immediate prospect of sanctions relief for Iran, and no solid progress in negotiations with the West over the country's nuclear programme, Ciara Lee asks why talks have still not produced results and what a resolution would mean for both parties. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Flying Enthusiast Converts Real-Life Aircraft Cockpit Into Simulator

Flying Enthusiast Converts Real-Life Aircraft Cockpit Into Simulator

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Nov. 25, 2014) A virtual flying enthusiast converts parts of a written-off Airbus aircraft into a working flight simulator in his northern Slovenian home. Jim Drury reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Car Park Solution for Flexible Green Energy

Car Park Solution for Flexible Green Energy

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Nov. 24, 2014) A British solar power start-up says that by covering millions of existing car park spaces around the UK with flexible solar panels, the country's power problems could be solved. Suzannah Butcher reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Microsoft Adds Robot Guards, Ushers In Sci-Fi Apocalypse

Microsoft Adds Robot Guards, Ushers In Sci-Fi Apocalypse

Newsy (Nov. 23, 2014) Microsoft has robotic security guards working at its Silicon Valley Campus. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Space & Time

Matter & Energy

Computers & Math

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins