Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Cornell Ergonomist Offers Web Guidelines On How Children Can Avoid Injury While At Their Computers

Date:
February 17, 2000
Source:
Cornell University
Summary:
American children typically spend between one and three hours a day at a computer, putting them at high risk for wrist, neck and back problems, says a Cornell University ergonomist.

ITHACA, N.Y. -- American children typically spend between one and three hours a day at a computer, putting them at high risk for wrist, neck and back problems, says a Cornell University ergonomist.

Related Articles


The problem is their sitting position. The rule of thumb is that knees and elbows should be placed at an angle of 90 degrees or greater, says Alan Hedge, professor of design and environmental analysis at Cornell and director of Cornell's Human Factors and Ergonomics Laboratory, speaking at the National Ergonomics Conference in Anaheim, Calif., in December. To help schools and parents provide safer workstations, Hedge is offering guidelines on the World Wide Web. The site, at http://ergo.human.cornell.edu/cuchildcomp.html, provides articles on "Workstation Ergonomics Guidelines for Computer Use by Children," "Ergonomics and Children: How to Prevent Injury in the Classroom" and "Ergonomic Guidelines for Arranging a Computer Workstation -- 10 Tips for Users."

Hedge, who has co-authored several research papers on how computer use by schoolchildren puts them at high risk for injuries, now offers ways to combat these injuries. Among his recommendations: Students should have good back support, place their feet on the floor or on a footrest, and the angles of their elbows and knees should be no tighter than 90 degrees. Perhaps most important is wrist angle: wrists should be in a flat, neutral position while typing.

"This is best achieved by using a keyboard on a lowered, negatively sloped keyboard tray. In schools, computer stations should be adjustable," Hedge says. "Our studies indicate that without any instruction, middle-school students, for example, reduce their risk for musculoskeletal problems when they work at an adjustable, ergonomically designed workstation."

In his presentation at the conference, Hedge pointed out that:

-- 95 percent of schools now have computers for student use;

-- There are 4.4 million computers in American schools, with an average student-to-computer ratio of 10-to-1;

-- 63 percent of 9- to 17- year-olds prefer web surfing to watching TV;

-- Internet savvy students get more A's than other students but do worse in spelling, punctuation and grammar;

-- At present rates, today's children will spend more than two years during their lifetimes on e-mail and more than 23 years on the Internet.

Hedge will be presenting a paper on children's ergonomics with his colleague, Associate Professor Lorraine Maxwell, and graduate student Marisol Marrero at the 24th Triennial Congress of the International Ergonomics Association, to be held in conjunction with the 44th annual meeting of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society, July 30 to Aug. 4 in San Diego.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Cornell University. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Cornell University. "Cornell Ergonomist Offers Web Guidelines On How Children Can Avoid Injury While At Their Computers." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 17 February 2000. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2000/02/000217084044.htm>.
Cornell University. (2000, February 17). Cornell Ergonomist Offers Web Guidelines On How Children Can Avoid Injury While At Their Computers. ScienceDaily. Retrieved January 27, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2000/02/000217084044.htm
Cornell University. "Cornell Ergonomist Offers Web Guidelines On How Children Can Avoid Injury While At Their Computers." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2000/02/000217084044.htm (accessed January 27, 2015).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Computers & Math News

Tuesday, January 27, 2015

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Cablevision Enters Wi-Fi Phone Fray

Cablevision Enters Wi-Fi Phone Fray

Reuters - Business Video Online (Jan. 26, 2015) The entry by Cablevision and Google could intensify the already heated price wars for mobile phone service. Fred Katayama reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Hector the Robot Mimics a Giant Stick Insect

Hector the Robot Mimics a Giant Stick Insect

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Jan. 26, 2015) A robot based on a stick insect can navigate difficult terrain autonomously and adapt to its surroundings. Tara Cleary reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Scientists Model Flying, Walking Drone After Vampire Bats

Scientists Model Flying, Walking Drone After Vampire Bats

Buzz60 (Jan. 26, 2015) Swiss scientists build a new drone that can both fly and walk, modeling it after the movements of common vampire bats. Jen Markham (@jenmarkham) has the story. Video provided by Buzz60
Powered by NewsLook.com
Malaysia Airlines Hack: Lizard Squad, ISIS Involved?

Malaysia Airlines Hack: Lizard Squad, ISIS Involved?

Newsy (Jan. 26, 2015) Malaysia Airlines on Sunday experienced website outages and what appeared to be an attack by hacker group Lizard Squad. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Space & Time

Matter & Energy

Computers & Math

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

    Health News

    Environment News

    Technology News



    Save/Print:
    Share:

    Free Subscriptions


    Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

    Get Social & Mobile


    Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

    Have Feedback?


    Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
    Mobile: iPhone Android Web
    Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
    Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
    Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins