Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Big gap exists on health care spending between Latinos and whites, study finds

Date:
July 27, 2011
Source:
University of California - Los Angeles
Summary:
Foreign-born Latinos living in the United States are much less likely to spend for health care and when they do are more likely to pay out-of-pocket for heath care when compared with the white population, but, over time, that disparity shrinks for naturalized Latinos the longer they stay in the country. But, for non-citizen Latinos, the disparities on health care spending remain large over time.

New research out of UCLA has found that Latinos living in the United States -- particularly those who were born outside the country -- are far less likely to spend for health care and are more likely to pay out-of-pocket when they do spend than the white population.

And while that disparity shrinks for naturalized Latinos the longer they stay in the country, spending disparities remain large over time for non-citizen Latinos, the researchers found.

Arturo Vargas Bustamante, an assistant professor in the department of health services at the UCLA School of Public Health, and Jie Chen of the City University of New York examined health-expenditure disparities among Latinos based on their time of residence in the U.S. and their citizenship/nativity status.

They found that Latinos, including both the native-born and foreign-born populations, were 68 percent more likely than whites to have no health care spending at all and were 6 percent more likely than whites to pay out-of-pocket if they did spend. They also found that Latino health expenditures were, on average, only 57 percent of white expenditures.

Over time, the disparities between foreign-born naturalized Latinos and whites narrowed or disappeared, the researchers said, but disparities between foreign-born non-citizen Latinos and whites remained constant or declined only slightly.

The results appear in the current online edition of the journal Health Services Research.

The researchers used two national datasets, the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS) and the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) from the United States National Center for Health Statistics. MEPS provides detailed consumer information on an individual's health expenditures, socioeconomic characteristics, health and health insurance status. They linked the MEPS data to 2000-07 NHIS data to obtain information on time of U.S. residence, individual citizenship and immigration status. Combined, their data examined 76,000 non-Latino whites and 31,500 Latino adults.

Because foreign-born U.S. residents are less likely to spend on health care, Bustamante said, the disparity could be related to the high share of foreign-born individuals among Latinos, compared with other racial and ethnic groups. Lower spending from this population, he said, could also be related to limited eligibility for public plan coverage, a lack of familiarity with the U.S. health care system, a greater reliance on going back across the border for health services, or other factors.

"Our study shows that differences are largely explained by related factors with this population, such as a relatively young age, low income, fewer years of schooling, good health status and lower health care access and utilization," Bustamante said.

The findings, he said, highlight the importance of having health insurance coverage and a usual source of care to help reduce the inequalities between Latinos and whites.

But the good news, Bustamante said, is that over 10 years, disparities between foreign-born Latinos and native-born Latinos become less pronounced. This could be interpreted as evidence of intergenerational improvement and of a gradual assimilation of the Latino population in the United States, he said.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of California - Los Angeles. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

University of California - Los Angeles. "Big gap exists on health care spending between Latinos and whites, study finds." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 27 July 2011. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/07/110727151440.htm>.
University of California - Los Angeles. (2011, July 27). Big gap exists on health care spending between Latinos and whites, study finds. ScienceDaily. Retrieved August 2, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/07/110727151440.htm
University of California - Los Angeles. "Big gap exists on health care spending between Latinos and whites, study finds." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/07/110727151440.htm (accessed August 2, 2014).

Share This




More Health & Medicine News

Saturday, August 2, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Texas Quintuplets Head Home

Texas Quintuplets Head Home

Reuters - US Online Video (Aug. 1, 2014) After four months in the hospital, the first quintuplets to be born at Baylor University Medical Center head home. Linda So reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Ebola Patient Coming to U.S. for Treatment

Ebola Patient Coming to U.S. for Treatment

Reuters - US Online Video (Aug. 1, 2014) A U.S. aid worker infected with Ebola while working in West Africa will be treated in a high security ward at Emory University in Atlanta. Linda So reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Ebola Vaccine Might Be Coming, But Where's It Been?

Ebola Vaccine Might Be Coming, But Where's It Been?

Newsy (Aug. 1, 2014) Health officials are working to fast-track a vaccine — the West-African Ebola outbreak has killed more than 700. But why didn't we already have one? Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Study Links Certain Birth Control Pills To Breast Cancer

Study Links Certain Birth Control Pills To Breast Cancer

Newsy (Aug. 1, 2014) Previous studies have made the link between birth control and breast cancer, but the latest makes the link to high-estrogen oral contraceptives. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins