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Racial resentment tied to voter ID law preferences, U.S. poll finds

Date:
July 18, 2012
Source:
University of Delaware
Summary:
A new U.S. poll reveals support for voter identification laws is strongest among Americans who harbor negative sentiments toward African Americans.

A new National Agenda Opinion Poll by the University of Delaware's Center for Political Communication reveals support for voter identification laws is strongest among Americans who harbor negative sentiments toward African Americans.

Voter ID laws require individuals to show government issued identification when they vote. The survey findings support recent comments by U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder, who portrayed a Texas photo ID law now being challenged as similar to poll taxes used in the Jim Crow era, primarily by Southern states, to block African Americans from voting. Holder pledged to oppose "political pretexts" which, he said, "disenfranchise" black voters.

The national telephone survey of 906 Americans was conducted by the University of Delaware's Center for Political Communication from May 20-June 6, 2012. Research faculty David C. Wilson and Paul Brewer supervised the study, as states and the federal government confront the voter ID issue.

Racial Resentment

To assess attitudes toward African Americans, all non-African Americans respondents in the poll were asked a series of questions (see Appendix). Responses to these questions were combined to form a measure of "racial resentment." Researchers found that support for voter ID laws is highest among those with the highest levels of "racial resentment."

Brewer, the center's associate director for research, said, "These findings suggest that Americans' attitudes about race play an important role in driving their views on voter ID laws."

Ideology, politics shape ID opinion

The survey reveals strong partisan and ideological divisions on racial resentment. Republicans and conservatives have the highest "racial resentment" scores, and Democrats and liberals have the lowest; Independents and moderates are in the middle. In addition, Democrats and liberals are least supportive of voter ID laws, whereas Republicans and conservatives are most supportive. The link between "racial resentment" and support for such laws persists even after controlling for the effects of partisanship, ideology, and a range of demographic variables.

Wilson, the center's coordinator of public opinion initiatives and an expert on race and public opinion, said, "Who votes in America has always been controversial; so much so that the U.S. constitution has been amended a number of times to protect voting eligibility and rights. It comes as no surprise that Republicans support these laws more than Democrats; but, what is surprising is the level at which Democrats and liberals also support the laws."

Here, CPC researchers found an interesting pattern in the data: it is Democrats and liberals whose opinions on voter ID laws are most likely to depend on their racial attitudes. Republicans and conservatives overwhelmingly support voter ID laws regardless of how much "racial resentment" they express. In contrast, Democrats and liberals with the highest "racial resentment" express much more support for voter ID laws than those with the least resentment.

About the study

The National Agenda Opinion Project research was funded by the University of Delaware's Center for Political Communication (CPC) and the UNIDEL Foundation. The study was supervised by the CPC's Coordinator for Public Opinion Initiatives, David C. Wilson, an associate professor in the Department of Political Science and International Relations, and the CPC's Assistant Director for Research, Paul Brewer, a Professor in the Department of Communication.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Delaware. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

University of Delaware. "Racial resentment tied to voter ID law preferences, U.S. poll finds." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 18 July 2012. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/07/120718164608.htm>.
University of Delaware. (2012, July 18). Racial resentment tied to voter ID law preferences, U.S. poll finds. ScienceDaily. Retrieved August 30, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/07/120718164608.htm
University of Delaware. "Racial resentment tied to voter ID law preferences, U.S. poll finds." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/07/120718164608.htm (accessed August 30, 2014).

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