Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

New Microchip Could Mean Improvements In Auto Industry

Date:
August 21, 1997
Source:
Simon Fraser University
Summary:
A specialized microchip developed at Simon Fraser University could improve the way air bags deploy in crashes, calculate the punishment runners inflict on their knees, even build a better computer mouse.

A specialized microchip developed at Simon Fraser University could improve the way air bags deploy in crashes, calculate the punishment runners inflict on their knees, even build a better computer mouse.

Related Articles


There's a huge market for the thumbnail-sized innovation which measures acceleration, motion and vibration. The automobile industry alone uses 100 million similar devices each year.

However, prototypes of the SFU chip have proven to be 1,000 times more sensitive than current devices and could, for example, significantly improve the control of cars when skidding, or how they ride on shock absorbers.

"Current devices cost $5 to $8, when purchased in volume, but ours can be manufactured for under a dollar," reports Albert Leung, professor and director of SFU's school of engineering science, who developed the device -- a micromachined thermal accelerometer -- and led the university research project.

Leung first scribbled down his design for the better chip in 1984 on an airplane on the way to a successful job interview at SFU.

In 1995, he found time in his busy research and teaching schedule -- and the scrap of paper -- and began to develop the device with professor John Jones, graduate student Maria Pascal and research assistants Eva Czyzewska, Jiaming Chen and Bill Woods.

"Project Hot Air" is what they dubbed their work when they began two-and-a-half years ago. The name refers to the hot air bubble at the heart of the microchip and the reaction of many skeptics who told them it was impossible.

The SFU group has applied for a worldwide patent and is expecting significant benefits, but is waiting for the patent before publishing its research. The university industry liaison office provided prototype development and continues to be very involved.

"We hope the technology will be transferred to private industry," says Leung. "where sufficient research and development budgets can take advantage of the full commercial potential."

The micromachined thermal accelerometer was unveiled in Ottawa this week, where it earned the Canadian Semiconductor Design Association award.

CONTACT: Albert Leung, 291-4194/4371Bruce Mason, media/pr, 291-3035Media/pr's web site: http://www.sfu.ca/mediapr


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Simon Fraser University. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Simon Fraser University. "New Microchip Could Mean Improvements In Auto Industry." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 21 August 1997. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1997/08/970821001616.htm>.
Simon Fraser University. (1997, August 21). New Microchip Could Mean Improvements In Auto Industry. ScienceDaily. Retrieved March 27, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1997/08/970821001616.htm
Simon Fraser University. "New Microchip Could Mean Improvements In Auto Industry." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1997/08/970821001616.htm (accessed March 27, 2015).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Matter & Energy News

Friday, March 27, 2015

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Amazon Complains U.S. Is Too Slow To Regulate Drones

Amazon Complains U.S. Is Too Slow To Regulate Drones

Newsy (Mar. 25, 2015) Days after getting approval to test certain commercial drones, Amazon says the Federal Aviation Administration is dragging its feet on the matter. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Smartphone Use Changing Our Brain and Thumb Interaction, Say Researchers

Smartphone Use Changing Our Brain and Thumb Interaction, Say Researchers

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Mar. 25, 2015) European researchers say our smartphone use offers scientists an ideal testing ground for human brain plasticity. Dr Ako Ghosh&apos;s team discovered that the brains and thumbs of smartphone users interact differently from those who use old-fashioned handsets. Jim Drury went to meet him. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
China Wants to Export Its Steel Problem

China Wants to Export Its Steel Problem

Reuters - Business Video Online (Mar. 25, 2015) China is facing a crisis with a glut of steel and growing public anger over the pollution created by production. In a move to solve the problem, some steel mills are looking to relocate overseas. Jane Lanhee Lee reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Robot Stays on Its Feet Despite Punishment

Robot Stays on Its Feet Despite Punishment

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Mar. 24, 2015) Robotic engineers have modelled a two-legged robot to be fast and agile like an ostrich. The design is more efficient and stable than bipedal robots built to move like humans, according to its creators who abuse the poor machine to test its skills. Ben Gruber has more. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Space & Time

Matter & Energy

Computers & Math

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins