Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Parenting CD-ROM Helps Reduce Children's Behavioral Problems

Date:
July 29, 1998
Source:
Ohio University
Summary:
Studies involving an interactive CD-ROM that offers instruction on parenting skills suggest the three-hour program can help reduce the frequency and severity of children's behavioral problems, according to an Ohio University psychologist who presented the findings at a recent conference in Washington, D.C.

ATHENS, Ohio -- Studies involving an interactive CD-ROM that offers instruction on parenting skills suggest the three-hour program can help reduce the frequency and severity of children's behavioral problems, according to an Ohio University psychologist who presented the findings at a recent conference in Washington, D.C.

Related Articles


The CD-ROM, Parenting Wisely, offers nine video dramas depicting common family problems, such as poor school performance and sibling rivalry. The program offers a choice of possible resolutions and potential outcomes for each. Designed for people of varying computer skills, the software requires user participation, which may be one reason for its apparent success.

"There's been a lot of research that suggests interactive computer technology promotes faster learning," says Donald Gordon, professor of psychology at Ohio University and creator of Parenting Wisely. "The key seems to be the interactive process. People have to take an active role in the learning process. They spend more time with it because it's so interesting."

Gordon presented research on the program's effectiveness July 11 at the annual meeting of the Coalition for Marriage, Family and Couples Education.

For one study, researchers recruited 72 parents whose children had been involved with the juvenile courts or children services agencies in Athens, Hocking and Washington counties in Ohio. Parents received either the parenting CD-ROM or were assigned to a control group.

Prior to their participation, parents completed several questionnaires, including the Eyeberg Child Behavior Inventory, a tool widely used by researchers to measure behavioral disorders in children. In follow-up surveys at one, three and six months after treatment, parents assigned to the CD-ROM group reported more than 60 percent fewer behavioral problems with their children while parents in the control group reported no change.

Parents who used the CD-ROM also scored higher on tests that measure knowledge of parenting skills, such as how to resolve conflict with their children, constructive discipline techniques and how to motivate children to do better in school.

In a second study, researchers recruited 38 mothers of middle school students in Athens County. Parents were randomly assigned to the Parenting Wisely program or to a control group.

Results from the Eyeberg inventory suggested that parents in the CD-ROM study were seeing an average of 13.8 specific types of behavioral problems in their children, such as disobedience, temper tantrums or lying. Four months after the parents finished the program, they completed the Eyeberg inventory again.

"The average number of behavioral problems their kids experienced dropped to 5.8, a pretty significant decrease," Gordon says. "To see such a long-term effect from a three-hour program was surprising."

Studies of Gordon's parenting CD-ROM have been conducted separately by five psychology graduate students at Ohio University over the course of four years, including Chris Kacir, co-author of the studies presented at the Washington, D.C., conference. Researchers at several other universities, including Kent State University and the University of New Mexico, also are involved in projects to test the program's effectiveness.

The program is in use in 13 states and in provinces throughout Canada and the United Kingdom. Courts in 22 Ohio counties require parents of juvenile offenders to complete the three-hour program and other courts have expressed interest in the treatment.

With the support of a $110,000 grant from the Office of Criminal Justice Services in Ohio, Gordon has provided 13 computer units and software packages to 11 counties around the state. The data he used for these recent studies included information gathered from these sites.

The program was created as a video disk called "Parenting Adolescents Wisely" several years ago and converted to CD-ROM in the fall of 1997. After its inception, Gordon worked with Ohio University's Innovation Center to found Family Works, a company created to market the CD-ROM, which sells for $900. So far, all proceeds from sales of the product have been used to fund graduate research, make improvements on the program, market the materials and to provide incentives for parents who might benefit from the CD-ROM.

Statistics suggest the frequency of juvenile crime in America has decreased in recent years. But Gordon says the numbers still are alarming: Nearly 3 million people under the age of 18 were arrested in 1996 in the United States, according to FBI statistics.

As the nation turns greater attention to the problem of juvenile crime, more courts and legislative bodies are holding parents accountable for the illegal actions of their children. Cities in Ohio, Michigan and Oregon are among many that have passed or are considering parental responsibility acts.

"Parents have the greatest amount of influence over these children and if we can do something to teach parents to be more responsible, we should do it," says Gordon, who holds an appointment in the College of Arts and Sciences. "Parents need to learn how to manage their kids' problem behaviors. If we don't offer this training, we're in a world of trouble."

- 30 -

Contact: Donald Gordon, (740) 593-1074; gordon@ohiou.edu

Written by Kelli Whitlock, (740) 593-0383; kwhitlock1@ohiou.edu


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Ohio University. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Ohio University. "Parenting CD-ROM Helps Reduce Children's Behavioral Problems." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 29 July 1998. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1998/07/980729063150.htm>.
Ohio University. (1998, July 29). Parenting CD-ROM Helps Reduce Children's Behavioral Problems. ScienceDaily. Retrieved January 25, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1998/07/980729063150.htm
Ohio University. "Parenting CD-ROM Helps Reduce Children's Behavioral Problems." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1998/07/980729063150.htm (accessed January 25, 2015).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Mind & Brain News

Sunday, January 25, 2015

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

How Technology Is Ruining Snow Days For Students

How Technology Is Ruining Snow Days For Students

Newsy (Jan. 25, 2015) — More schools are using online classes to keep from losing time to snow days, but it only works if students have Internet access at home. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Smart Wristband to Shock Away Bad Habits

Smart Wristband to Shock Away Bad Habits

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Jan. 23, 2015) — A Boston start-up is developing a wristband they say will help users break bad habits by jolting them with an electric shock. Ben Gruber reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Amazing Technology Allows Blind Mother to See Her Newborn Son

Amazing Technology Allows Blind Mother to See Her Newborn Son

RightThisMinute (Jan. 23, 2015) — Not only is Kathy seeing her newborn son for the first time, but this is actually the first time she has ever seen a baby. Kathy and her sister, Yvonne, have been legally blind since childhood, but thanks to an amazing new technology, eSight glasses, which gives those who are legally blind the ability to see, she got the chance to see the birth of her son. It&apos;s an incredible moment and an even better story. Video provided by RightThisMinute
Powered by NewsLook.com
One Dose, Then Surgery to Test Tumor Drugs Fast

One Dose, Then Surgery to Test Tumor Drugs Fast

AP (Jan. 23, 2015) — A Phoenix hospital is experimenting with a faster way to test much needed medications for deadly brain tumors. Patients get a single dose of a potential drug, and hours later have their tumor removed to see if the drug had any affect. (Jan. 23) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories

 

Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins