Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Ion Trap, Eye In The Sky, Pint-Sized Heat Pumps, and Pulp "Fix-ion" -- Research Highlights From Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Date:
March 31, 1999
Source:
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory
Summary:
Research highlights from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

QUARTERLY NEWS TIPSHEET -- Release date: Spring 1999

Contact: Media Relations, (509) 375-3776

Glass half full, half empty with trap -

A researcher's ability to analyze environmental samples just got easier. Scientists at Department of Energy's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory have created an ion trap mass spectrometer that simultaneously analyzes negative and positive ions. No commercially available mass spectrometer has this feature. The bipolar capability is crucial in state-of-the art mass spectrometry applications, including laser desorption of aerosol particles for atmospheric monitoring.

This trap also improves the quality of data that can be obtained in a single measurement, thus reducing the amount of averaging required for high quality measurements.

Pacific Northwest scientists tested the ion trap in 1998. The device has been demonstrated to companies that may be interested in commercializing this technology.

A bird's eye view of public lands -

Instead of riding the range, ranchers and government agencies now can use an "eye in the sky" to determine the condition of public grazing lands. Remote sensing tools developed at Pacific Northwest for the intelligence community are being put to work to help monitor and manage range land. Manual monitoring, the current practice, addresses only a fraction of acres of public lands across the western United States.

But new satellite imagery, sensor technology and advanced geographic information systems can quickly provide data on any plot of land to help determine trends in range quality. These tools may assist ranchers who are required by law to provide data that indicates the impact of grazing practices on range land.

Pint-sized heat pumps -

Pacific Northwest thinks small - when it comes to heat pumps. Researchers at the laboratory are developing a heat-actuated heat pump small enough to fit within the walls or floor of a home to provide efficient space heating and cooling. Increased efficiency comes from the fabrication of tiny channels within the heat exchanger, where much of the heat pump's work takes place. Smaller channels result in more effective heat transfer due to the intimate contact between the refrigerant and heat exchanger surfaces.

The heat pump uses heat, rather than electricity, to provide cooling. Researchers have developed miniaturized versions of the components for a prototype heat pump and expect to have a working system in about two years.

Development has been funded by the Department of Defense's Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency.

Pulp "Fix-ion" -

One of the obstacles to recycling water, energy and desirable chemicals in the pulp and paper industry is the presence of potassium and chloride ions in the process stream. A technology originally developed at Pacific Northwest to remove cesium from radioactive waste is being adapted to separate the potassium and recover valuable sodium.

Electrically Switched Ion Exchange, or ESIX, uses membranes coated with a suitable electroactive ion exchange material (nickel hexacyanoferrate for potassium). The membranes absorb the ions and then, when the polarity of the electrodes is reversed, the ions are unloaded into an appropriate waste stream.

The system has potential benefits of lower energy costs, increased selectivity for potassium salt and easier operation than other removal methods. Efficient removal of potassium and chloride reduces secondary waste and the down time necessary to clean a plant's recovery boiler.

###


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. "Ion Trap, Eye In The Sky, Pint-Sized Heat Pumps, and Pulp "Fix-ion" -- Research Highlights From Pacific Northwest National Laboratory." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 31 March 1999. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1999/03/990330114446.htm>.
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. (1999, March 31). Ion Trap, Eye In The Sky, Pint-Sized Heat Pumps, and Pulp "Fix-ion" -- Research Highlights From Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. ScienceDaily. Retrieved August 31, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1999/03/990330114446.htm
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. "Ion Trap, Eye In The Sky, Pint-Sized Heat Pumps, and Pulp "Fix-ion" -- Research Highlights From Pacific Northwest National Laboratory." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1999/03/990330114446.htm (accessed August 31, 2014).


More Matter & Energy News

Sunday, August 31, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Australian Airlines Relax Phone Ban Too

Australian Airlines Relax Phone Ban Too

Reuters - Business Video Online (Aug. 26, 2014) Qantas and Virgin say passengers can use their smartphones and tablets throughout flights after a regulator relaxed a ban on electronic devices during take-off and landing. As Hayley Platt reports the move comes as the two domestic rivals are expected to post annual net losses later this week. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Hurricane Marie Brings Big Waves to California Coast

Hurricane Marie Brings Big Waves to California Coast

Reuters - US Online Video (Aug. 26, 2014) Huge waves generated by Hurricane Marie hit the Southern California coast. Rough Cut (no reporter narration). Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Chinese Researchers Might Be Creating Supersonic Submarine

Chinese Researchers Might Be Creating Supersonic Submarine

Newsy (Aug. 26, 2014) Chinese researchers have expanded on Cold War-era tech and are closer to building a submarine that could reach the speed of sound. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Breakingviews: India Coal Strained by Supreme Court Ruling

Breakingviews: India Coal Strained by Supreme Court Ruling

Reuters - Business Video Online (Aug. 26, 2014) An acute coal shortage is likely to be aggravated as India's supreme court declared government coal allocations illegal, says Breakingviews' Peter Thal Larsen. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?