Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Impulsive Children More Prone To Injuries

Date:
May 25, 1999
Source:
Center For The Advancement Of Health
Summary:
Toddlers and preschoolers who are impulsive and tend to seek out new and unfamiliar activities overestimate their physical abilities as six year olds. They also experienced more injuries requiring medical attention compared with children who do not have these traits.

Toddlers and preschoolers who are impulsive and tend to seek out new and unfamiliar activities overestimate their physical abilities as six year olds. They also experienced more injuries requiring medical attention compared with children who do not have these traits.

Young children's temperaments offer important clues to their later risk of being injured unintentionally, according to the results of a longitudinal study reported in the current issue of Child Development.

"Childhood injuries are among the few child health problems where annual mortality rates have not significantly decreased over the past several decades," says David C. Schwebel of the University of Iowa, Iowa City. As public health workers have sought to develop programs to prevent childhood injuries, researchers have begun to explore the psychological factors that may play a role.

Schwebel and colleague Jodie M. Plumert, Ph.D., evaluated 59 children when they were 33 months old, 46 months old and six years old. The children completed a standard battery of tests designed to measure their "inhibitory control" -- whether they were impulsive or deliberate in responding to new situations - and their level of "extraversion" - whether they sought out and responded to novel situations enthusiastically. At six years old, the researchers tested the children's skill at estimating their own physical abilities, for example, having them predict whether they could reach a toy off of a wooden block beyond their grasp. Mothers also provided ratings of their impulsivity and extraversion and a history of the children's injuries.

Children who scored high on extraversion and low on inhibitory control as preschoolers and toddlers tended to overestimate their physical abilities at age six. They also experienced more injuries requiring medical attention. The picture was reversed for those who scored low on extraversion and high on inhibitory control; they tended to underestimate their physical abilities and have few injuries.

Schwebel and Plumert suggest that injury prevention programs should target children with vulnerable temperaments, including those who tend to overestimate their physical abilities and those whose impulsiveness and desire for novel situations leaves them at higher risk of injury.

The data collected at age 6 was supported by a Spelman Rockefeller seed grant from the University of Iowa Obermann Center for Advanced Studies. The data collected at 33 and 46 months were collected in a separate investigation conducted by Grazyna Kochanska, who was supported by grants from the National Science Foundation and National Institute of Mental Health.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Center For The Advancement Of Health. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Center For The Advancement Of Health. "Impulsive Children More Prone To Injuries." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 25 May 1999. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1999/05/990525061426.htm>.
Center For The Advancement Of Health. (1999, May 25). Impulsive Children More Prone To Injuries. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 29, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1999/05/990525061426.htm
Center For The Advancement Of Health. "Impulsive Children More Prone To Injuries." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1999/05/990525061426.htm (accessed July 29, 2014).

Share This




More Health & Medicine News

Tuesday, July 29, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Deadly Ebola Virus Threatens West Africa

Deadly Ebola Virus Threatens West Africa

AP (July 28, 2014) West African nations and international health organizations are working to contain the largest Ebola outbreak in history. It's one of the deadliest diseases known to man, but the CDC says it's unlikely to spread in the U.S. (July 28) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
$15B Deal on Vets' Health Care Reached

$15B Deal on Vets' Health Care Reached

AP (July 28, 2014) A bipartisan deal to improve veterans health care would authorize at least $15 billion in emergency spending to fix a veterans program scandalized by long patient wait times and falsified records. (July 28) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Two Americans Contract Ebola in Liberia

Two Americans Contract Ebola in Liberia

Reuters - US Online Video (July 28, 2014) Two American aid workers in Liberia test positive for Ebola while working to combat the deadliest outbreak of the virus ever. Linda So reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Traditional African Dishes Teach Healthy Eating

Traditional African Dishes Teach Healthy Eating

AP (July 28, 2014) Classes are being offered nationwide to encourage African Americans to learn about cooking fresh foods based on traditional African cuisine. The program is trying to combat obesity, heart disease and other ailments often linked to diet. (July 28) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins