Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Engineers Rush To Deploy Wind Measuring Equipment In Advance Of Hurricane Floyd

Date:
September 16, 1999
Source:
Clemson University
Summary:
Engineers--led by teams from Clemson University--are scrambling to deploy four mobile data-acquisition platforms squarely in the path of oncoming Hurricane Floyd. The "wind towers" will provide an accurate ground-level picture of the wind speed and direction. Clemson researchers can then use that data to help improve building codes for coastal areas.

Using Clemson expertise on unprecedented project

CLEMSON, S.C.-- Engineers--led by teams from Clemson University--are scrambling to deploy four mobile data-acquisition platforms squarely in the path of oncoming Hurricane Floyd.

The "wind towers" will provide an accurate ground-level picture of the wind speed and direction. Clemson researchers can then use that data to help improve building codes for coastal areas.

"We hope to have our platforms right in the heart of the hurricane when it comes, getting details as they happen, where they're happening," said Scott Schiff, an associate professor in civil engineering at Clemson. Research leader on the projects is Tim Reinhold, also an associate professor of civil engineering at Clemson. Each steel-reinforced platform, which weighs up to 4,500 pounds, is specifically designed to withstand hurricane-force winds and features special securing legs.

The teams--and towers--were initially stationed in South Florida on a project to measure how hurricane-force winds affect houses retrofitted for the storms. That initiative, called the Florida Coastal Monitoring Project, is sponsored by the Florida Department of Community Affairs and includes the University of Florida and Florida International University . But the teams re-deployed the wind towers toward the Carolinas when Floyd continued tracking north.

At rest, each wind tower looks like a giant spider on its back, with legs clutched to its stomach. When fully deployed, the trailer's central tower extends 33 feet into the air while other out-rigger "legs" will extend downward to form a giant X. The points of that X will then literally be screwed into the ground with 2.5-foot earth screws. The platforms can be fully extended and secured in place in as little as 20 minutes.

Most platforms will feature three anemometers specifically designed to operate in high-wind storms. The devices will measure wind speed at heights of 33 feet, a standard reference height, and 15 feet, the height of a typical single-story home. That information will then be relayed along steel-reinforced cables to an onboard computer housed in a reinforced box. The equipment will be powered by generator for the first nine hours, with batteries providing an additional 19 hours of operating time.

The approximately $100,000 project is funded with monies from Clemson University, the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, the Federal Emergency Management Agency and the Florida Department of Community Affairs.

"This gives us one of our first chances to get the high-resolution wind-speed data - near the ground, close to where a storm passes - that we need in order to develop design bases for hurricane-resistant homes," said James K. Nelson Jr., chair of Clemson's civil engineering department.

Typical airport anemometers simply aren't designed to collect this type of information, said Nelson. Hurricane-hunting aircraft, meanwhile, only measure wind speed at considerable altitude and usually do not make measurements over land.

Clemson's Wind Load Test Facility is one of the nation's top laboratories for testing the effects of wind on low-rise structures such as homes and schools.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Clemson University. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Clemson University. "Engineers Rush To Deploy Wind Measuring Equipment In Advance Of Hurricane Floyd." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 16 September 1999. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1999/09/990916075500.htm>.
Clemson University. (1999, September 16). Engineers Rush To Deploy Wind Measuring Equipment In Advance Of Hurricane Floyd. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 24, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1999/09/990916075500.htm
Clemson University. "Engineers Rush To Deploy Wind Measuring Equipment In Advance Of Hurricane Floyd." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1999/09/990916075500.htm (accessed July 24, 2014).

Share This




More Matter & Energy News

Thursday, July 24, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

TSA Administrator on Politics and Flight Bans

TSA Administrator on Politics and Flight Bans

AP (July 24, 2014) TSA administrator, John Pistole's took part in the Aspen Security Forum 2014, where he answered questions on lifting of the ban on flights into Israel's Tel Aviv airport and whether politics played a role in lifting the ban. (July 24) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Creative Makeovers for Ugly Cellphone Towers

Creative Makeovers for Ugly Cellphone Towers

AP (July 24, 2014) Mobile phone companies and communities across the country are going to new lengths to disguise those unsightly cellphone towers. From a church bell tower to a flagpole, even a pencil, some towers are trying to make a point. (July 24) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Algonquin Power Goes Activist on Its Target Gas Natural

Algonquin Power Goes Activist on Its Target Gas Natural

TheStreet (July 23, 2014) When The Deal's Amanda Levin exclusively reported that Gas Natural had been talking to potential suitors, the Ohio company responded with a flat denial, claiming its board had not talked to anyone about a possible sale. Lo and behold, Canadian utility Algonquin Power and Utilities not only had approached the company, but it did it three times. Its last offer was for $13 per share as Gas Natural's was trading at a 60-day moving average of about $12.50 per share. Now Algonquin, which has a 4.9% stake in Gas Natural, has taken its case to shareholders, calling on them to back its proposals or, possibly, a change in the target's board. Video provided by TheStreet
Powered by NewsLook.com
Robot Parking Valet Creates Stress-Free Travel

Robot Parking Valet Creates Stress-Free Travel

AP (July 23, 2014) 'Ray' the robotic parking valet at Dusseldorf Airport in Germany lets travelers to avoid the hassle of finding a parking spot before heading to the check-in desk. (July 23) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

    Health News

      Environment News

        Technology News



          Save/Print:
          Share:

          Free Subscriptions


          Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

          Get Social & Mobile


          Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

          Have Feedback?


          Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
          Mobile: iPhone Android Web
          Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
          Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
          Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins