Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Miami Study Investigates Physiological Effect Of Video Games On Children

Date:
November 1, 1999
Source:
University Of Miami
Summary:
Many parents worry about the psychological effects of their children playing hours upon hours of video games but what about the physiological impact. Can video games lead to elevated stress levels or other health risks in young people?

CORAL GABLES, FL -- Many parents worry about the psychological effects of their children playing hours upon hours of video games but what about the physiological impact. Can video games lead to elevated stress levels or other health risks in young people? Unfortunately, almost no scientific data is available on this topic. That is why researchers at the University of Miami are conducting a new study that measures the biological responses of children while playing video games.

"We've already seen an inverse relationship between the amount of time spent watching TV and the obesity levels in kids," said Arlette Perry, director of the Human Performance Lab at UM, who is leading the study. "We want to see if video games are as bad as TV in terms of decreasing metabolic rates."

Instruments monitoring the children measure their heart rate, breathing rate and blood pressure. In addition, the researchers will measure how many calories are being burned, how much oxygen is being consumed, and other factors in children that may change when stimulated by the games.

The current study involves 20 boys ages 7 to 9 who are closely monitored while they play video games in the UM lab. The reason the researchers selected only boys to take part in the study was to eliminate gender variables in physiology.

Perry, a professor of exercise and sports, said preliminary results indicate a significant difference between children watching TV and playing video games. When playing video games, Perry has observed that children's glucose levels shoot up and the stress level and metabolic rate also increase.

Perry hopes to have preliminary results of the study available in the next few weeks.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University Of Miami. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

University Of Miami. "Miami Study Investigates Physiological Effect Of Video Games On Children." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 1 November 1999. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1999/11/991101072132.htm>.
University Of Miami. (1999, November 1). Miami Study Investigates Physiological Effect Of Video Games On Children. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 24, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1999/11/991101072132.htm
University Of Miami. "Miami Study Investigates Physiological Effect Of Video Games On Children." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1999/11/991101072132.htm (accessed July 24, 2014).

Share This




More Mind & Brain News

Thursday, July 24, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

New Painkiller Designed To Discourage Abuse: Will It Work?

New Painkiller Designed To Discourage Abuse: Will It Work?

Newsy (July 24, 2014) The FDA approved Targiniq ER on Wednesday, a painkiller designed to keep users from abusing it. Like any new medication, however, it has doubters. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Can Watching TV Make You Feel Like A Failure?

Can Watching TV Make You Feel Like A Failure?

Newsy (July 24, 2014) A study by German researchers claims watching TV while you're stressed out can make you feel guilty and like a failure. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
China's Ageing Millions Look Forward to Bleak Future

China's Ageing Millions Look Forward to Bleak Future

AFP (July 24, 2014) China's elderly population is expanding so quickly that children struggle to look after them, pushing them to do something unexpected in Chinese society- move their parents into a nursing home. Duration: 02:07 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Idaho Boy Helps Brother With Disabilities Complete Triathlon

Idaho Boy Helps Brother With Disabilities Complete Triathlon

Newsy (July 23, 2014) An 8-year-old boy helped his younger brother, who has a rare genetic condition that's confined him to a wheelchair, finish a triathlon. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

    Health News

      Environment News

        Technology News



          Save/Print:
          Share:

          Free Subscriptions


          Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

          Get Social & Mobile


          Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

          Have Feedback?


          Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
          Mobile: iPhone Android Web
          Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
          Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
          Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins