Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

NEAR Captures Asteroid's Heart ... In A Photo

Date:
February 15, 2000
Source:
Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory
Summary:
The Near Earth Asteroid Rendezvous spacecraft, approaching its Valentine's Day date with a space rock named for the Greek god of love, has snapped a picture of the asteroid's heart. Literally. Asteroid 433 Eros has what appears to be a heart-shaped crater or depression in its surface.

Media Contacts: Mike Buckley 240-228-7536, orHelen Worth240-228-5113

Related Articles


The Near Earth Asteroid Rendezvous (NEAR) spacecraft, approaching its Valentine's Day date with a space rock named for the Greek god of love, has snapped a picture of the asteroid's heart. Literally.

The image, one of 8,000 photos of asteroid 433 Eros taken by NEAR since January, shows what looks like a large heart carved in the asteroid. The image is posted on the NEAR Web site.

"It truly is a valentine from Eros," says NEAR Mission Director Robert Farquhar.

NEAR's digital camera captured the feature Feb. 11 from 1,609 miles (2,590 kilometers) away. The image surprised science team members Saturday as they processed the incoming data. The narrow, 3-mile (5-kilometer) heart-shaped depression appears just below a large ridge on the 21-mile (33-kilometer) potato-shaped asteroid. Until the spacecraft sends closer images, however, NEAR team members at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (APL) can't say for sure what the shadowy heart really is.

It's a tantalizing mystery," says Dr. Joseph Veverka, of Cornell University, who leads the NEAR imaging team. "It makes you wonder, what other secrets are lurking in the heart of Eros?"

NEAR will begin unfolding such mysteries when the spacecraft meets up with Eros Monday at 10:33 a.m. (EST) and becomes the first spacecraft to orbit an asteroid. APL designed and built NEAR and manages the mission for NASA. For the latest mission news and images, visit the NEAR Web site at http://near.jhuapl.edu.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory. "NEAR Captures Asteroid's Heart ... In A Photo." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 15 February 2000. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2000/02/000214094354.htm>.
Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory. (2000, February 15). NEAR Captures Asteroid's Heart ... In A Photo. ScienceDaily. Retrieved March 3, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2000/02/000214094354.htm
Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory. "NEAR Captures Asteroid's Heart ... In A Photo." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2000/02/000214094354.htm (accessed March 3, 2015).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Space & Time News

Tuesday, March 3, 2015

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Raw: SpaceX Launches Rocket, Satellites on Board

Raw: SpaceX Launches Rocket, Satellites on Board

AP (Mar. 2, 2015) SpaceX launched it&apos;s 16th Falcon 9 rocket from Cape Canaveral, Florida on Sunday night. The rocket was carrying two commercial communications satellites. (March 2) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Astronauts Leave Space Station for Third Spacewalk

Astronauts Leave Space Station for Third Spacewalk

Reuters - News Video Online (Mar. 1, 2015) NASA Commander Barry Wilmore and Flight Engineer Terry Virts perform their third spacewalk in eight days outside the International Space Station. Rough Cut (no reporter narration). Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Spacesuit Water Leaks Not An Issue On Latest ISS Walk

Spacesuit Water Leaks Not An Issue On Latest ISS Walk

Newsy (Mar. 1, 2015) Astronauts are ahead of schedule with hardware upgrades to the International Space Station, despite last week&apos;s spacesuit water leak scare. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Nitrogen-Based Life Might Swim On Saturn's Largest Moon

Nitrogen-Based Life Might Swim On Saturn's Largest Moon

Newsy (Feb. 28, 2015) Researchers at Cornell University theorize life might exist on Saturn’s largest moon as nitrogen-based organisms. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Space & Time

Matter & Energy

Computers & Math

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins