Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Medians Mean Safer Streets, Researcher Finds

Date:
October 10, 2000
Source:
University Of Arkansas
Summary:
University of Arkansas researcher Jim Gattis has found that, although limited-access medians on urban thoroughfares often draw public objections, they reduce traffic delays and increase safety.

FAYETTEVILLE, Ark. -- University of Arkansas researcher Jim Gattis has found that, although limited-access medians on urban thoroughfares often draw public objections, they reduce traffic delays and increase safety.

Related Articles


"Sometimes if planners give in to the demands of a small, vocal group, the general public is denied the traffic safety and convenience it deserves," said Gattis. "Planners and politicians need to communicate the improved safety and reduced congestion these designs provide."

Gattis recently conducted research projects in two mid-sized cities -- Springfield, Mo., and Muskogee, Okla. The results of his Springfield study, which confirmed the Muskogee findings, were presented recently at the Transportation Research Board's Fourth National Conference on Access Management.

Springfield is a small urban area in southwestern Missouri with a population nearing 300,000. It is home to Southwestern Missouri State University, which has over 16,000 students, as well as 10 small colleges. It is Missouri's third largest retail center.

Gattis' study of three major street segments in the same part of Springfield included traffic volume and accident data for the segments and all signalized intersecting streets. All of the street segments had four traffic lanes and same level of commercial development. One segment had an uncrossable median with few intersections spaced relatively far apart.

"The segment with the median had 20 percent fewer crashes and 20 percent fewer injuries than the other two segments," said Gattis. "In addition, traffic flow was better, with 50 percent fewer delays than on the undivided segments."

A study that Gattis conducted in Muskogee, Okla., produced similar results. The street with a high level of access management -- an uncrossable median with a limited number of driveways -- was both safer and had fewer delays to motorists.

Traffic engineers have known about this for decades, according to Gattis. Although it was recommended practice in the National Urban Street Design Manual in the 1950s, it has largely been ignored until recently. This is because conflicting demands from the public frequently cause problems for city and state street planners.

"Now some states, such as Missouri and Kansas, as well as some cities, are developing programs to implement high-level access management on a larger scale," Gattis explained. "Basically it comes down to how much the government entity is committed to traffic safety and avoiding congestion. Will they listen to expertise in the field or just repeat the errors of the past?"


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University Of Arkansas. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

University Of Arkansas. "Medians Mean Safer Streets, Researcher Finds." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 10 October 2000. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2000/10/001010072835.htm>.
University Of Arkansas. (2000, October 10). Medians Mean Safer Streets, Researcher Finds. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 25, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2000/10/001010072835.htm
University Of Arkansas. "Medians Mean Safer Streets, Researcher Finds." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2000/10/001010072835.htm (accessed October 25, 2014).

Share This



More Matter & Energy News

Saturday, October 25, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

IKEA Desk Converts From Standing to Sitting With One Button

IKEA Desk Converts From Standing to Sitting With One Button

Buzz60 (Oct. 24, 2014) IKEA is out with a new convertible desk that can convert from a sitting desk to a standing one with just the push of a button. Jen Markham explains. Video provided by Buzz60
Powered by NewsLook.com
Ebola Protective Suits Being Made in China

Ebola Protective Suits Being Made in China

AFP (Oct. 24, 2014) A factory in China is busy making Ebola protective suits for healthcare workers and others fighting the spread of the virus. Duration: 00:38 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Real-Life Transformer Robot Walks, Then Folds Into a Car

Real-Life Transformer Robot Walks, Then Folds Into a Car

Buzz60 (Oct. 24, 2014) Brave Robotics and Asratec teamed with original Transformers toy company Tomy to create a functional 5-foot-tall humanoid robot that can march and fold itself into a 3-foot-long sports car. Jen Markham has the story. Video provided by Buzz60
Powered by NewsLook.com
Police Testing New Gunfire Tracking Technology

Police Testing New Gunfire Tracking Technology

AP (Oct. 24, 2014) A California-based startup has designed new law enforcement technology that aims to automatically alert dispatch when an officer's gun is unholstered and fired. Two law enforcement agencies are currently testing the technology. (Oct. 24) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Space & Time

Matter & Energy

Computers & Math

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins