Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Plastic Surgeons Face War Injuries From Iraq To Inner-city Violence

Date:
October 9, 2008
Source:
American Society of Plastic Surgeons
Summary:
Born out of war, plastic surgery remains at the forefront of surgical innovation, and advances from the war in Iraq and Afghanistan benefit victims of inner city wars being fought on our streets.

Born out of war, plastic surgery remains at the forefront of surgical innovation, and advances from the war in Iraq and Afghanistan benefit victims of inner city wars being fought on our streets.

At the American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS) Plastic Surgery 2008 conference, Oct. 31 – Nov. 5, in Chicago, civilian and military plastic surgeons will participate in a panel discussion about the challenges created by today's high-powered weaponry and the advances in facial reconstruction accelerated by wartime.

"Plastic surgery is a specialty that, unfortunately, always makes significant advances in wartime," said Colonel Thomas Crabtree, MD, ASPS Member Surgeon and panel moderator.

"The surgical problems we face from the frontlines to stateside military hospitals are challenging to say the least, but the advances made benefit both wounded warriors and civilians hurt in inner-city violence or trauma."

Plastic surgeons specialize in bone and soft tissue reconstruction of the face and skull. From the war in Iraq and Afghanistan, ASPS Member Surgeons face patients who have suffered large scale blast trauma wounds from high explosive detonations or high velocity missiles.

At Walter Reed Army Medical Center, Lieutenant Colonel Raymond Harshbarger, MD, ASPS Member Surgeon and panel participant, treats soldiers with facial and skull injuries with a 3-D model of their skull, created from CT scans. These models help in pre-operative planning and surgery.

"From these models, we can help soldiers who are missing half their skull or the upper part of their face by fashioning an innovative prefabricated, patient-specific implant to remodel their lost bone," said Dr. Harshbarger. "We also use special woven titanium as implants for the skull on soldiers who have large-scale defects of missing bone and tissue."

Dr. Harshbarger added they are working toward bridging these innovative technologies – modeling and implants – with tissue engineering. "In the future we hope to produce an implant that is biodegradable and will induce bone formation so that the implant (in the shape of the deformity) will absorb over time and new bone will be created. We're moving down this pathway, but it will be years before it becomes reality."

Back on the streets of America, Eduardo Rodriguez, MD, ASPS Member Surgeon and panel participant, treats injuries from gun shots and high-speed auto and motorcycle accidents. "I treated a young woman from the inner-city who was protecting her sleeping child by covering him with her body when high velocity gunshots blew off one of her arms and she lost a large part of her cheek. Many of the bones in her face were fractured and there was major tissue missing."

Reconstruction of these types of injuries involves free tissue transfer where Dr. Rodriguez takes tissue from a different area of the body like the hip with its blood vessels, and reconnects it to the missing area of the face.

"These cases are incredibly difficult to perform, often taking up to 10 hours," said Dr. Rodriguez. "But you get so committed to these cases. This young lady saved her baby's life, now I wanted to help her. The pressure is incredible, it's like you are in the SuperBowl and its 4th and goal. But the rewards are amazing. We can do so much to help these patients now, where they previously would be left with devastating injuries."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by American Society of Plastic Surgeons. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

American Society of Plastic Surgeons. "Plastic Surgeons Face War Injuries From Iraq To Inner-city Violence." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 9 October 2008. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/10/081008114410.htm>.
American Society of Plastic Surgeons. (2008, October 9). Plastic Surgeons Face War Injuries From Iraq To Inner-city Violence. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 20, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/10/081008114410.htm
American Society of Plastic Surgeons. "Plastic Surgeons Face War Injuries From Iraq To Inner-city Violence." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/10/081008114410.htm (accessed October 20, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Monday, October 20, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

How Nigeria Beat Its Ebola Outbreak

How Nigeria Beat Its Ebola Outbreak

Newsy (Oct. 20, 2014) The World Health Organization has declared Nigeria free of Ebola. Health experts credit a bit of luck and the government's initial response. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Another Study Suggests Viagra Is Good For The Heart

Another Study Suggests Viagra Is Good For The Heart

Newsy (Oct. 20, 2014) An ingredient in erectile-dysfunction medications such as Viagra could improve heart function. Perhaps not surprising, given Viagra's history. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Ebola Worries End for Dozens on U.S. Watch Lists

Ebola Worries End for Dozens on U.S. Watch Lists

Reuters - US Online Video (Oct. 20, 2014) Forty-three people who had contact with Thomas Eric Duncan, the first person diagnosed with Ebola in the U.S., were cleared overnight of twice-daily monitoring after 21 days of showing no symptoms. Rough Cut (no reporter narration). Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Fauci: Ebola Protocols to Focus on Training

Fauci: Ebola Protocols to Focus on Training

AP (Oct. 20, 2014) Dr. Anthony Fauci, head of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, says he expects revised CDC protocols on Ebola to focus on training, observation and ensuring health care workers are more protected. (Oct. 20) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins