Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Intended Effect Of Business Parks Is Minimal, Study Finds

Date:
November 5, 2008
Source:
Erasmus University Rotterdam
Summary:
In recent years, policy makers have invested billions in large business parks, the idea being that organizing businesses and universities in geographical clusters would encourage strategic alliances and innovation. However, this certainly does not apply to the pharmaceutical industry, as one researcher has discovered. Physical proximity between organizations plays a much smaller role than expected when it comes to gaining access to valuable external knowledge about new medicines.

In recent years, policy makers have invested billions in large business parks, the idea being that organising businesses and universities in geographical clusters would encourage strategic alliances and innovation. However, this certainly does not apply to the pharmaceutical industry, as Sandra Phlippen discovered.

Physical proximity between organisations plays a much smaller role than expected when it comes to gaining access to valuable external knowledge about new medicines. On Wednesday 5 November 2008, Phlippen will be defending her dissertation Come close and co create. Proximities in pharmaceutical innovation networks, at Erasmus University Rotterdam, the Netherlands.

For her dissertation, Sandra Phlippen examined how different forms of proximity between organisations affect their capacity for strategic collaboration, which in recent years has become increasingly important in the pharmaceutical industry. Previously new medicines were mostly brought out by the laboratories of the large pharmaceutical companies, but their long period of hegemony is well and truly over.

The lack of successful internal medicines, the expiry of patent rights from past successes, and finally the enormous expansion of alternative technology for the development of medicines have prompted pharmaceutical companies to explore opportunities for working together with external partners. As a result, innovations in the biopharmaceutical industry generally occur through partnerships between biotech companies, universities and pharmaceutical companies.

Phlippen made a distinction in her research between the effect of co-location (geographical proximity), the effect of being embedded in a network (relational proximity) and the effect of being in a common knowledge field (cognitive proximity). She discovered that the effect of geographical clustering is very limited, in spite of the many billions that are being invested in setting up business parks for companies and universities.

“It is much more important for organisations to be ‘embedded’ in (often international) networks based on previous strategic partnerships. New partnership links for developing medicines are primarily the result of both organisations having a common partner with whom they have worked in the past. What matters, therefore, is not where you are, but whom you know,” explains Sandra Phlippen.

Once a collaborative partnership between two organisations has been established, it is important that there is sufficient common, that is, overlapping. knowledge between them. At the same time, the number of external partnerships cannot be too great, because knowledge about new medicines is so complex that the transfer of knowledge between two organisations requires the same researchers to work on both external and internal projects. It is only under this condition that knowledge that has been acquired externally can be successfully applied internally.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Erasmus University Rotterdam. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Erasmus University Rotterdam. "Intended Effect Of Business Parks Is Minimal, Study Finds." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 5 November 2008. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/11/081105083551.htm>.
Erasmus University Rotterdam. (2008, November 5). Intended Effect Of Business Parks Is Minimal, Study Finds. ScienceDaily. Retrieved April 20, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/11/081105083551.htm
Erasmus University Rotterdam. "Intended Effect Of Business Parks Is Minimal, Study Finds." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/11/081105083551.htm (accessed April 20, 2014).

Share This



More Science & Society News

Sunday, April 20, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Drought Concerns May Hurt Lake Tourism

Drought Concerns May Hurt Lake Tourism

AP (Apr. 18, 2014) Operators of recreational businesses on western reservoirs worry that ongoing drought concerns will keep boaters and other visitors from flocking to the popular summer attractions. (April 18) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Small Reactors Could Be Future of Nuclear Energy

Small Reactors Could Be Future of Nuclear Energy

AP (Apr. 17, 2014) After the Fukushima nuclear disaster, the industry fell under intense scrutiny. Now, small underground nuclear power plants are being considered as the possible future of the nuclear energy. (April 17) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Heartbleed Hack Leads To Arrest

Heartbleed Hack Leads To Arrest

Newsy (Apr. 17, 2014) A 19-year-old computer science student has been arrested in relation to a data breach of 900 social insurance numbers from Canada's revenue agency. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Scientists Create Stem Cells From Adult Skin Cells

Scientists Create Stem Cells From Adult Skin Cells

Newsy (Apr. 17, 2014) The breakthrough could mean a cure for some serious diseases and even the possibility of human cloning, but it's all still a way off. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins