Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Peru Study Shows Restrictive Law Fails To Limit Number Of Abortions

Date:
February 3, 2009
Source:
Canadian Medical Association Journal
Summary:
Despite abortion being severely legally restricted -- and potentially unsafe -- in Peru, the incidence of abortion is as high as or higher than the incidence in many countries where it is legal and safe, a new study finds.

Despite abortion being severely legally restricted – and potentially unsafe – in Peru, the incidence of abortion is as high as or higher than the incidence in many countries where it is legal and safe, found researchers from Peru, the United Kingdom and the United States in an article published in CMAJ.

Clandestine induced abortion is a significant public health issue in many countries where access to abortion is severely legally restricted. Abortions are often available only in cases of rape or incest or when a pregnancy threatens the health or life of the woman, causing many women to pursue clandestine abortions, which are often unsafe. Forty percent of women live in countries where abortions are legally restricted.

As comprehensive official statistics are lacking, this study provides valuable public health data.

The researchers conducted a population-based survey of almost 8000 women aged 18-29 years in 20 Peruvian cities. They found that 11.6% of women reported having abortions and 7.5% of sexually experienced 18-year-olds – the youngest age surveyed – reported having had abortions.

"We hope that this study will contribute to increased awareness of the scale of the problem and political willingness to address it, for which there is public support in Latin America," write Dr. Bernabι Ortiz from the Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia in Lima, Peru and coauthors.

They state that provision of contraception and education needs to be greatly improved and will lead to reduced abortion rates as half of the sexually-active women in the study did not use birth control.

In a related commentary, Professor Rebecca Cook of the University of Toronto's Faculty of Law writes that laws limiting access to abortion do not reduce the number of abortions but reduce safety.

"When governments ignore evidence, such as that presented in the study by Bernabι Ortiz and colleagues, and refuse to collect official statistics on abortion or ensure transparent access to legal abortion services, they are increasingly held accountable by national, regional and international human rights courts and tribunals for the arbitrary exercise of their power," states Professor Cook. "They are also increasingly held accountable for causing preventable deaths and disabilities of women."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Canadian Medical Association Journal. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Bernabe-Ortiz et al. Clandestine induced abortion: prevalence, incidence and risk factors among women in a Latin American country. CMAJ, 2009; 180: 298-304 [link]

Cite This Page:

Canadian Medical Association Journal. "Peru Study Shows Restrictive Law Fails To Limit Number Of Abortions." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 3 February 2009. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/02/090202174508.htm>.
Canadian Medical Association Journal. (2009, February 3). Peru Study Shows Restrictive Law Fails To Limit Number Of Abortions. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 2, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/02/090202174508.htm
Canadian Medical Association Journal. "Peru Study Shows Restrictive Law Fails To Limit Number Of Abortions." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/02/090202174508.htm (accessed October 2, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Thursday, October 2, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Pregnancy Spacing Could Have Big Impact On Autism Risks

Pregnancy Spacing Could Have Big Impact On Autism Risks

Newsy (Oct. 1, 2014) — A new study says children born less than one year and more than five years after a sibling can have an increased risk for autism. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Robotic Hair Restoration

Robotic Hair Restoration

Ivanhoe (Oct. 1, 2014) — A new robotic procedure is changing the way we transplant hair. The ARTAS robot leaves no linear scarring and provides more natural results. Video provided by Ivanhoe
Powered by NewsLook.com
Insertable Cardiac Monitor

Insertable Cardiac Monitor

Ivanhoe (Oct. 1, 2014) — A heart monitor the size of a paperclip that can save your life. The “Reveal Linq” allows a doctor to monitor patients with A-Fib on a continuous basis for up to 3 years! Video provided by Ivanhoe
Powered by NewsLook.com
Attacking Superbugs

Attacking Superbugs

Ivanhoe (Oct. 1, 2014) — Two weapons hospitals can use to attack superbugs. Scientists in Ireland created a new gel resistant to superbugs, and a robot that can disinfect a room in minutes. Video provided by Ivanhoe
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories

 

Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins