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New Method For Assessing Mood Changes

Date:
April 7, 2009
Source:
Journal of Psychotherapy and Psychosomatics
Summary:
A new study suggests that the MOODS-SR, a measure of mood spectrum symptomatology, is sensitive to change in depression status and may help the clinician to detect symptoms and signs not considered by established symptom severity scales.
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Instruments that are intended to measure change over time need to emphasize sensitivity to change as a central property. The aims of this report are to test whether the MOODS-SR, a measure of mood spectrum symptomatology, is sensitive to changes during acute and continuation treatment of depression and whether residual mood spectrum symptoms predict relapse in the subsequent 6 months.

The study sample includes 316 patients with nonpsychotic depression participating in the protocol 'Depression: the search for treatment-relevant phenotypes'. Patients were initially randomized to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors or interpersonal psychotherapy and then treated for 9 months using an algorithm-based protocol.

Measures of mood symptomatology included the self-report version of the structured clinical interview for mood spectrum (MOODS-SR), the Quick Inventory for Depressive Symptomatology and the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression. Repeated-measures ANOVA indicates that during the acute phase MOODS scores decrease significantly from baseline to weeks 6 and 12. This decrease was significantly different (p < 0.001) between those who remitted and those who did not remit on the depressive, the rhythmicity component and the total score. Nonrelapsing subjects had stable scores across the continuation phase, while among relapsing subjects, a significant increase was found in the depressive component (p < 0.001), the rhythmicity component (p = 0.024) and the total score (p < 0.001), at 2 months, followed by a decrease from 2 to 6 months. Scores on the depressive component at the entry into continuation predicted relapse in the subsequent 6 months.

This investigation suggests that the MOODS-SR is sensitive to change in depression status and may help the clinician to detect symptoms and signs not considered by established symptom severity scales.


Story Source:

The above post is reprinted from materials provided by Journal of Psychotherapy and Psychosomatics. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Miniati, M.; Rucci, P.; Frank, E.; Oppo, A.; Kupfer,D.J.; Fagiolini, A.; Cassano, G.B. Sensitivity to Change and Predictive Validity of the MOODS-SR Questionnaire, Last-Month Version. Psychother Psychosom, 2009;78:116-124

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Journal of Psychotherapy and Psychosomatics. "New Method For Assessing Mood Changes." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 7 April 2009. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/04/090407075140.htm>.
Journal of Psychotherapy and Psychosomatics. (2009, April 7). New Method For Assessing Mood Changes. ScienceDaily. Retrieved August 1, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/04/090407075140.htm
Journal of Psychotherapy and Psychosomatics. "New Method For Assessing Mood Changes." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/04/090407075140.htm (accessed August 1, 2015).

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