Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Even In Hostile Working Environments, Employees Reluctant To Leave Jobs

Date:
May 20, 2009
Source:
Kansas State University
Summary:
Researchers have found that almost half of employees in hostile work environments had no definite plans to leave their current job. In addition, 59 percent indicated that they either liked or did not dislike their current job.

She never gets invited to lunch with the rest of her co-workers. He always gets publically criticized for his mistakes.

Related Articles


But according to research by Kansas State University psychologists, neither of these workers is likely to leave the job.

Meridith Selden, a K-State doctoral graduate in psychology, and her adviser, Ron Downey, K-State professor of psychology, studied workplace hostility. They found that among workers reporting hostility in the current position, almost half -- 45 percent of them -- had no definite plans to leave their current job. In addition, 59 percent indicated that they either liked or did not dislike their current job.

And this research took place well before the economic downturn.

"They might like the job, just not certain elements of it," Downey said. "That really surprised us, that people weren't ready to jump ship. We talk about the new workplace where people don't stay at the same job forever, but getting a job is difficult and people don't like to do it."

Selden and Downey presented the research in April at the Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology conference in New Orleans.

The researchers had gathered the data through online surveys that participants found through a Web site, Web searcher or word of mouth.

"Companies don't want to talk about workplace hostility," Downey said. "This is a common methodology when they don't want to let researchers in."

He and Selden asked workers about non-physical hostile behaviors that they experienced in the workplace. That included hostile behaviors that were both exclusionary and interfering. For example, exclusionary hostility is being reprimanded in front of others, having your contributions ignored or being excluded from activities like coffee breaks. Interfering hostility prohibits you from doing your job, such as being gossiped about or having your equipment sabotaged.

"Exclusion issues are the ones that bother people considerably," Downey said. "It's like if everyone goes to lunch routinely but doesn't invite you."

The researchers found that workers feel equally harmed by this hostility whether it comes from co-workers or supervisors.

"You would think that hostility from the supervisor would cause more worry, but it didn't here," Downey said. "Many people still thought that their supervisor was helpful and were no less satisfied with the supervisor."

Downey, whose other research has centered on workplace stress, said that the ramifications of hostile behaviors could be experienced later, even if workers remain positive for the time being.

"These kinds of behaviors just arouse stress for people at work," he said. "If you're talking about stress and get feelings of being upset while at the job, that leads to burnout. That's when you leave the job."

Downey said that many employers have specialized staff -- whether in the company or on contract -- who can mediate in these situations.

"By the time it gets to them, it has probably gotten way out of control," he said.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Kansas State University. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Kansas State University. "Even In Hostile Working Environments, Employees Reluctant To Leave Jobs." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 20 May 2009. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/05/090514111412.htm>.
Kansas State University. (2009, May 20). Even In Hostile Working Environments, Employees Reluctant To Leave Jobs. ScienceDaily. Retrieved November 21, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/05/090514111412.htm
Kansas State University. "Even In Hostile Working Environments, Employees Reluctant To Leave Jobs." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/05/090514111412.htm (accessed November 21, 2014).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Science & Society News

Friday, November 21, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

WFP: Ebola Risks Heightened Among Women Throughout Africa

WFP: Ebola Risks Heightened Among Women Throughout Africa

AFP (Nov. 21, 2014) Having children has always been a frightening prospect in Sierra Leone, the world's most dangerous place to give birth, but Ebola has presented an alarming new threat for expectant mothers. Duration: 00:37 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Toyota's Hydrogen Fuel-Cell Green Car Soon Available in the US

Toyota's Hydrogen Fuel-Cell Green Car Soon Available in the US

AFP (Nov. 21, 2014) Toyota presented its hydrogen fuel-cell compact car called "Mirai" to US consumers at the Los Angeles auto show. The car should go on sale in 2015 for around $60.000. It combines stored hydrogen with oxygen to generate its own power. Duration: 01:18 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Ebola: Life Without School in Guinea

Ebola: Life Without School in Guinea

AFP (Nov. 21, 2014) Following the closure of schools and universities in Guinea because of the Ebola virus, students look for temporary work or gather in makeshift classrooms to catch up on their syllabus. Duration: 02:14 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
NSA Director: China Can Damage US Power Grid

NSA Director: China Can Damage US Power Grid

AP (Nov. 20, 2014) China and "one or two" other countries are capable of mounting cyberattacks that would shut down the electric grid and other critical systems in parts of the United States, according to Adm. Michael Rogers, director of the National Security Agency and hea Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Science & Society

Business & Industry

Education & Learning

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins