Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Surgery Residents Satisfied With Training, Concerned With Confidence, Career Motivation

Date:
September 22, 2009
Source:
JAMA and Archives Journals
Summary:
A survey of nearly 4,500 general surgery residents finds that the majority are satisfied with their training and relationships with faculty and peers, but also indicated concerns regarding motivations for pursuing surgical careers and the need to complete specialty training, according to a new study.

A survey of nearly 4,500 general surgery residents finds that the majority are satisfied with their training and relationships with faculty and peers, but also indicated concerns regarding motivations for pursuing surgical careers and the need to complete specialty training, according to a study in the September 23/30 issue of JAMA, a theme issue on medical education.

Related Articles


General surgery residency training is facing formidable pressures, including less attraction to surgery as a profession, increasing interest in surgical subspecialization, and estimated attrition rates of 17 percent to 26 percent among categorical general surgery residents, rates that are higher than other medical residencies, according to background information in the article. "At the same time, a substantial shortage of general surgeons is predicted. Strategies responding to these complex and competing challenges can be informed by understanding general surgery residents' attitudes and experiences regarding training, and their association with attrition," the authors write.

Heather Yeo, M.D., M.H.S.R., of the Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Conn., and colleagues conducted a survey in January 2008 of U.S. general surgery residents to characterize their attitudes, experiences, and expectations regarding residency training and to identify predictors of attrition from residency training. Of 5,345 categorical general surgery residents, 4,402 (82.4 percent) responded, representing 248 of 249 surgical residency programs.

The researchers found that the majority of respondents (3,686, 85.2 percent) expressed high levels of satisfaction with training. "The majority of respondents (71.6 percent) reported that their program has support structures for residents who are struggling and that they can turn to the faculty when having difficulties in the program (71.9 percent). Residents generally reported very positive collaborative relationships with peers, with [84.2 percent] indicating that they can count on other residents to help them out when they are having a problem," the authors write.

A series of items examined various sources of stress and concern among residents. "Notable proportions of residents reported feeling uneasy or troubled by aspects of training and skill development," the researchers write. Of the respondents, 30.7 percent reported that the stress of work is causing strain on their family life. Also, 27.5 percent expressed apprehension about their clinical skills, worrying that they will not feel confident enough to perform procedures by themselves before they finish training, while 63.7 percent reported worry about hurting patients. Additionally, 63.8 percent of respondents indicated that they will need to complete additional specialty training in order to be competitive in the job market.

Regarding selected items analyzed by sex, men were more likely to report being satisfied with residency training than women, and women were more likely to have considered leaving residency during the prior year; men were more likely to feel their training program would provide them with someone to turn to when they are struggling and to feel they can turn to members of the faculty when having difficulties in the program.

"Reports of having considered leaving training in the prior year differed significantly across years, highest in postgraduate year 2 (19.2 percent) and lowest in postgraduate year 5 (7.2 percent)," the researchers add.

"This baseline descriptive study … may help inform efforts to respond to the complex pressures facing the surgical profession, including the ability to attract and retain increasingly diverse general surgery residents and the projected shortage of general surgeons in the coming decades," the authors conclude.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by JAMA and Archives Journals. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Heather Yeo; Kate Viola; David Berg; Zhenqiu Lin; Marcella Nunez-Smith; Cortland Cammann; Richard H. Bell, Jr; Julie Ann Sosa; Harlan M. Krumholz; Leslie A. Curry. Attitudes, Training Experiences, and Professional Expectations of US General Surgery Residents: A National Survey. JAMA, 2009; 302 (12): 1301-1308 [link]

Cite This Page:

JAMA and Archives Journals. "Surgery Residents Satisfied With Training, Concerned With Confidence, Career Motivation." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 22 September 2009. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/09/090922162255.htm>.
JAMA and Archives Journals. (2009, September 22). Surgery Residents Satisfied With Training, Concerned With Confidence, Career Motivation. ScienceDaily. Retrieved November 26, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/09/090922162255.htm
JAMA and Archives Journals. "Surgery Residents Satisfied With Training, Concerned With Confidence, Career Motivation." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/09/090922162255.htm (accessed November 26, 2014).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Health & Medicine News

Wednesday, November 26, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Pet Dogs to Be Used in Anti-Ageing Trial

Pet Dogs to Be Used in Anti-Ageing Trial

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Nov. 26, 2014) Researchers in the United States are preparing to discover whether a drug commonly used in human organ transplants can extend the lifespan and health quality of pet dogs. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Today's Prostheses Are More Capable Than Ever

Today's Prostheses Are More Capable Than Ever

Newsy (Nov. 26, 2014) Advances in prosthetics are making replacement body parts stronger and more lifelike than they’ve ever been. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
From Popcorn To Vending Snacks: FDA Ups Calorie Count Rules

From Popcorn To Vending Snacks: FDA Ups Calorie Count Rules

Newsy (Nov. 25, 2014) The US FDA is announcing new calorie rules on Tuesday that will require everywhere from theaters to vending machines to include calorie counts. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Daily Serving Of Yogurt Could Reduce Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes

Daily Serving Of Yogurt Could Reduce Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes

Newsy (Nov. 25, 2014) Need another reason to eat yogurt every day? Researchers now say it could reduce a person's risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins