Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

New safety concern related to antipsychotic treatment

Date:
December 2, 2009
Source:
Elsevier
Summary:
Overall, antipsychotic medications are reasonably effective, and fairly well tolerated treatments for mood and psychotic disorders. However, treatment with a number of antipsychotic medications is associated with weight gain, and for some, hyperglycemia and hyperlipidemia. In a new article, researchers discuss this cluster of metabolic side effects and how it may contribute to the risk for diabetes, hypertension, and other medical disorders associated with heart disease.

Overall, antipsychotic medications are reasonably effective, and fairly well tolerated treatments for mood and psychotic disorders. However, treatment with a number of antipsychotic medications is associated with weight gain, and for some, hyperglycemia and hyperlipidemia. In the current issue of Biological Psychiatry, published by Elsevier, researchers discuss this cluster of metabolic side effects and how it may contribute to the risk for diabetes, hypertension, and other medical disorders associated with heart disease. This is of particular concern because there is a higher cardiovascular mortality among the severely mentally ill compared to the general population.

Researchers already know that differences exist between antipsychotics in their effect on clinical measures associated with cardiovascular risk, namely weight, lipids and glucose. Systemic inflammation has recently emerged as an important marker of cardiovascular risk, but the effects of antipsychotics on inflammatory markers in the blood have not been extensively studied until now.

Using data from the multi-center CATIE (Clinical Antipsychotic Trials of Intervention Effectiveness) study, funded by the National Institute of Mental Health, Jonathan Meyer and colleagues examined the impact of multiple antipsychotic therapies on changes in systemic inflammation. Their findings provide evidence that antipsychotic medications, particularly olanzapine (Zyprexaฎ, Eli Lilly and Co.) and quetiapine (Seroquelฎ, AstraZeneca), increase the levels of inflammation markers.

The markers implicated include C-reactive protein, E-selectin, and intercellular adhesion molecular-1 (ICAM-1). Increased levels of C-reactive protein in particular are associated with increased risk for the development or progression of many illnesses including heart disease, and stroke.

"This analysis provides the most compelling evidence to date that differences in antipsychotic metabolic liability are also seen with markers of systemic inflammation," explained Dr. Meyer. "It also provides an impetus for monitoring cardiovascular risk markers in antipsychotic treated patients."

Dr. John Krystal, the Editor of Biological Psychiatry, which is publishing this report, commented, "Doctors always try to balance the benefits and the risks associated with medications when making the decision to prescribe a particular medication to a particular patient. The more information that we have regarding the medical consequences of prescribing particular medications, the better the prescribing decisions can be." Although this report does not provide any direct evidence linking the antipsychotic medications to these disorders, he added that "it is helpful to know that antipsychotic medications may contribute to inflammatory processes in the body and that these medications differ somewhat in producing this effect."

The article is written by Jonathan M. Meyer, Joseph P. McEvoy, Vicki G. Davis, Donald C. Goff, Henry A. Nasrallah, Sonia M. Davis, John K. Hsiao, Marvin S. Swartz, T. Scott Stroup, and Jeffrey A. Lieberman. The authors affiliations are as follows: From the Department of Psychiatry (JMM), University of California at San Diego; VA San Diego Healthcare System (JMM), San Diego, California; Department of Psychiatry (JPM), Behavioral Sciences, Duke University, Clinical Research, John Umstead Hospital, Butner; Department of Biostatistics (VGD), Collaborative Studies Coordinating Center; Department of Psychiatry (TSS), University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill; Department of Psychiatry (MSS), Behavioral Sciences, Duke University Medical Center, Durham; Quintiles (SMD), Morrisville, North Carolina; Department of Psychiatry (DCG), Harvard University, Schizophrenia Program; General Hospital (DCG), Freedom Trail Clinic -- Lindemann, Mental Health Center, Boston, Massachusetts; Neuroscience (HAN), University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, Ohio; Adult Psychopharmacology Program (JKH), Division of Services and Interventions Research, National Institute of Mental Health, Bethesda, Maryland; and the Department of Psychiatry (JAL), Columbia University, Psychiatric Institute, New York, New York.

The article appears in Biological Psychiatry, Volume 66, Issue 11 (December 1, 2009), published by Elsevier.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Elsevier. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Meyer et al. Inflammatory Markers in Schizophrenia: Comparing Antipsychotic Effects in Phase 1 of the Clinical Antipsychotic Trials of Intervention Effectiveness Study. Biological Psychiatry, 2009; 66 (11): 1013 DOI: 10.1016/j.biopsych.2009.06.005

Cite This Page:

Elsevier. "New safety concern related to antipsychotic treatment." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 2 December 2009. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/12/091201100217.htm>.
Elsevier. (2009, December 2). New safety concern related to antipsychotic treatment. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 1, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/12/091201100217.htm
Elsevier. "New safety concern related to antipsychotic treatment." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/12/091201100217.htm (accessed October 1, 2014).

Share This



More Mind & Brain News

Wednesday, October 1, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Pregnancy Spacing Could Have Big Impact On Autism Risks

Pregnancy Spacing Could Have Big Impact On Autism Risks

Newsy (Oct. 1, 2014) — A new study says children born less than one year and more than five years after a sibling can have an increased risk for autism. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Stopping School Violence

Stopping School Violence

Ivanhoe (Oct. 1, 2014) — A trauma doctor steps out of the hospital and into the classroom to teach kids how to calmly solve conflicts, avoiding a trip to the ER. Video provided by Ivanhoe
Powered by NewsLook.com
Pineal Cysts: Debilitating Pain

Pineal Cysts: Debilitating Pain

Ivanhoe (Oct. 1, 2014) — A tiny cyst in the brain that can cause debilitating symptoms like chronic headaches and insomnia, and the doctor who performs the delicate surgery to remove them. Video provided by Ivanhoe
Powered by NewsLook.com
Burning Away Brain Tumors

Burning Away Brain Tumors

Ivanhoe (Oct. 1, 2014) — Doctors are 'cooking' brain tumors. Hear how this new laser-heat procedure cuts down on recovery time. Video provided by Ivanhoe
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories

 

Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins