Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Counseling increased mammography use among low-income women with health insurance

Date:
June 29, 2010
Source:
American Association for Cancer Research
Summary:
Even with health insurance, low-income women had lower rates of mammography screening than middle-class women, but a counseling program increased the likelihood of screening.

Even with health insurance, low-income women had lower rates of mammography screening than middle-class women, but a counseling program increased the likelihood of screening.

Related Articles


"Health insurance is a necessary condition for screening, but it is apparently not a sufficient condition," said Nasar Ahmed, Ph.D., chair of epidemiology and biostatistics at the Robert Stempel College of Public Health and Social Work at Florida International University.

Ahmed was the lead researcher on a recent report published in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research, which sought to determine the best way to increase compliance among low-income women.

The researchers identified 2,357 women who were non-compliant with their mammography screening, and randomly assigned them to one of three groups. The first group acted as a control, while the second group consisted of those who received a formal letter from their managed care organization reminding them of the need for screening. The third group received a second letter from their primary physician and, if still non-compliant, counseling from lay health workers.

The women in the trial had an average age of 53 years; 45 percent of the target population was white, 12 percent was Hispanic and 43 percent was black. Participants' annual family income was about $7,000 and all had health insurance for the previous five years.

Despite having health insurance, however, the screening rate in the control population was only 13.4 percent.

For the women who received a letter from their managed care organization, the rate increased to 16.1 percent.

The largest increase was for the women in the personal counseling group, where the rate was 27.1 percent, still well below general population rates. A letter from their primary care physician increased the likelihood of screening by 80 percent, while personal counseling tripled the rate of screening.

James Marshall, Ph.D., professor of oncology at the Roswell Park Cancer Institute, and a senior editor of Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention, said this study shows how low-income populations have challenges that go beyond mere finances.

"A middle-class person can hop in their car and go to the clinic. How does a low-income woman find someone to watch her kids and find the transportation?" said Marshall. "Also, middle-class people take the culture of bureaucracy for granted, but it can be intimidating for low-income people."

Marshall said Roswell Park has programs where lay health counselors go into area churches to reach minority, low-income women and they have found that process to be effective. In addition, Roswell Park has instituted a special navigator program for patients.

"A person from the community can make all the difference in the message," said Marshall, who was not associated with this report.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by American Association for Cancer Research. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

American Association for Cancer Research. "Counseling increased mammography use among low-income women with health insurance." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 29 June 2010. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/06/100629131314.htm>.
American Association for Cancer Research. (2010, June 29). Counseling increased mammography use among low-income women with health insurance. ScienceDaily. Retrieved December 21, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/06/100629131314.htm
American Association for Cancer Research. "Counseling increased mammography use among low-income women with health insurance." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/06/100629131314.htm (accessed December 21, 2014).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Health & Medicine News

Sunday, December 21, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Touch-Free Smart Phone Empowers Mobility-Impaired

Touch-Free Smart Phone Empowers Mobility-Impaired

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Dec. 21, 2014) A touch-free phone developed in Israel enables the mobility-impaired to operate smart phones with just a movement of the head. Suzannah Butcher reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Earthworms Provide Cancer-Fighting Bacteria

Earthworms Provide Cancer-Fighting Bacteria

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Dec. 21, 2014) Polish scientists isolate bacteria from earthworm intestines which they say may be used in antibiotics and cancer treatments. Suzannah Butcher reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Existing Chemical Compounds Could Revive Failing Antibiotics, Says Danish Scientist

Existing Chemical Compounds Could Revive Failing Antibiotics, Says Danish Scientist

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Dec. 21, 2014) A team of scientists led by Danish chemist Jorn Christensen says they have isolated two chemical compounds within an existing antipsychotic medication that could be used to help a range of failing antibiotics work against killer bacterial infections, such as Tuberculosis. Jim Drury went to meet him. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Hugging It Out Could Help You Ward Off A Cold

Hugging It Out Could Help You Ward Off A Cold

Newsy (Dec. 21, 2014) Carnegie Mellon researchers found frequent hugs can help people avoid stress-related illnesses. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins