Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Hospitals: Unique training results in significant knowledge of quality principles

Date:
April 11, 2011
Source:
Emory University
Summary:
The effectiveness of a unique two-pronged educational program has shown significant improvements in knowledge of quality principles by leaders as well as the successful design and launch of quality improvement projects by frontline staff, according to new results.

The effectiveness of a unique two-pronged educational program has shown significant improvements in knowledge of quality principles by leaders as well as the successful design and launch of QI (quality improvement) projects by frontline staff, according to results outlined in an article in the April 2011 issue of The Joint Commission Journal on Quality and Patient Safety.

Related Articles


Lessons learned from the program results, which originated at Emory Healthcare in Atlanta, should be useful to health care organizations as they weigh alternative strategies to promote QI activities and a culture of quality across their organizations, according to authors led by Dr. Kimberly Rask, MD, Ph.D, an associate professor in the Rollins School of Public Health at Emory University. The projects that were implemented as part of the practical methods course are being systematically evaluated for sustainability and longer-term impact on patient outcomes.

"This initiative shows the feasibility of implementing a broad-based in-house QI training program for multidisciplinary staff across an integrated health system. Initial assessment shows knowledge improvements and successful QI project implementations, with many projects active up to one year following the courses," says Dr. Rask.

"The opportunity to improve quality and patient safety in health care settings has been well documented," Rask adds. "Health care organizations use a variety of strategies to promote quality improvement activities, but there is little evidence to date about the most effective strategies. Studies have shown that clinically focused training in QI techniques can improve patient safety and reduce inefficiency."

The project spanned five Emory hospitals and a multispecialty physician practice. One two-day program, 'Leadership for Healthcare Improvement,' was offered to leadership, and a four-month program, 'Practical Methods for Healthcare Improvement,' was offered to frontline staff and middle managers.

Participants in the leadership program completed self-assessments of QI competencies and pre- and post-course QI knowledge tests. Semi-structured interviews with selected participants in the practical methods program were performed to assess QI project sustainability and short-term outcomes. More than 600 employees completed one of the training programs in 2008 and 2009. Leadership course participants significantly improved knowledge in all content areas, and self-assessments revealed high comfort levels with QI principles following the training. All practical methods participants were able to initiate and implement QI projects.

Participants described significant challenges with team functionality, but a majority of the QI projects made progress toward achieving their aim statement goals. A review of completed projects shows that a significant number were sustained up to one year after program completion. Quality leaders continue to modify the program based on learner feedback and institutional goals.

Other researchers at Emory included: Richard S. Gitomer, M.D., chief quality officer, Emory University Hospital Midtown; Nathan O. Spell III, M.D., chief quality officer, Emory University Hospital; Steven D. Culler, Ph.D., associate professor, Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University; Sarah C. Blake, M.S., senior associate; Susan S. Kohler, R.N., M.P.H., senior research project associate; Jonathan N. Hawley, senior research project coordinator; and William A. Bornstein, M.D., Ph.D., chief quality officer, Emory Healthcare.

The project evaluation was supported by a grant from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation's "Evidence for Improvement: Evaluating Quality Improvement Training Programs" initiative.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Emory University. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Rask, Kimberly J.; Gitomer, Richard S.; Spell, Nathan O.; Culler, Steven D.; Blake, Sarah C.; Kohler, Susan S.; Hawley, Jonathan N.; Bornstein, William A. A Two-Pronged Quality Improvement Training Program for Leaders and Frontline Staff. Joint Commission Journal on Quality and Patient Safety, Volume 37, Number 4, April 2011 , pp. 147-153(7) [link]

Cite This Page:

Emory University. "Hospitals: Unique training results in significant knowledge of quality principles." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 11 April 2011. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/04/110411163920.htm>.
Emory University. (2011, April 11). Hospitals: Unique training results in significant knowledge of quality principles. ScienceDaily. Retrieved February 28, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/04/110411163920.htm
Emory University. "Hospitals: Unique training results in significant knowledge of quality principles." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/04/110411163920.htm (accessed February 28, 2015).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Health & Medicine News

Saturday, February 28, 2015

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Could a $34 Smartphone Device Improve HIV Diagnosis in Africa?

Could a $34 Smartphone Device Improve HIV Diagnosis in Africa?

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Feb. 27, 2015) A dongle that plugs into a Smartphone mimics a lab-based blood test for HIV and syphilis and can detect the diseases in 15 minutes, say researchers. Tara Cleary reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Doctor Says Head Transplants Possible Within Two Years

Doctor Says Head Transplants Possible Within Two Years

Buzz60 (Feb. 27, 2015) An Italian doctor is saying he could stick someone&apos;s head onto someone else&apos;s body. Patrick Jones (@Patrick_E_Jones) reports. Video provided by Buzz60
Powered by NewsLook.com
How Your Dentist Could Help Screen You For Diabetes

How Your Dentist Could Help Screen You For Diabetes

Newsy (Feb. 27, 2015) A new study from researchers at New York University suggests dentists could soon use blood samples taken from patients&apos; mouths to test for diabetes. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
The Best Tips to Makeover Your Health

The Best Tips to Makeover Your Health

Buzz60 (Feb. 27, 2015) If you&apos;re looking to boost your health this season, there are a few quick and easy steps to prompt you for success. Krystin Goodwin (@Krystingoodwin) has the best tips to give your health a makeover this spring! Video provided by Buzz60
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins