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More accurate diagnosis of Alzheimer's

Date:
April 20, 2011
Source:
University of Gothenburg
Summary:
A new study from Sweden shows how analyzing spinal fluid can help to detect Alzheimer's disease at an early stage. The researchers behind the study hope that their findings will contribute to a greater international breakthrough for this type of diagnostic method.

A new study from the University of Gothenburg, Sweden, shows how analysing spinal fluid can help to detect Alzheimer's disease at an early stage. The researchers behind the study hope that their findings will contribute to a greater international breakthrough for this type of diagnostic method.

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It all comes down to biomarkers, substances that are found at abnormally high or low levels in patients who go on to develop Alzheimer's. The most common biomarkers to be identified by the researchers in the spinal fluid of patients with Alzheimer's are proteins and peptides -- short chains of amino acids.

"What's new about our study is that the biomarkers are really good, better than in the past, as the study was carried out extremely carefully with suitable participants via clinical trials and well implemented and controlled laboratory analyses," says docent Johan Svensson, who is working with professor Kaj Blennow's research group at the Sahlgrenska Academy, which has long been involved in researching the development of these biomarkers and advocating their use.

A total of 60 patients who were being investigated for dementia took part in the study, along with 20 healthy controls.

"We measured levels of the biomarkers in the spinal fluid and found that high levels of these substances confirmed the diagnosis of Alzheimer's with a high degree of accuracy compared with levels in healthy controls and patients with other forms of dementia," says Svensson.

"We also saw that patients who hadn't yet met all the clinical criteria for Alzheimer's had similar levels of the biomarkers in their spinal fluid to patients who had developed the disease fully."

The research group therefore concludes that these measurements can also be used to identify Alzheimer's during the early stages of the disease. In such cases, the biomarkers can be used to identify those patients with mild symptoms who are most likely to benefit from treatment.

"If a medication that affects the course of the disease does become available, it will probably be most effective during the early stages, and these biomarkers could be used in the development of such a medication," says Svensson.

The study will be published in the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of Gothenburg. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Per Johansson, Niklas Mattsson, Oskar Hansson, Anders Wallin, Jan-Ove Johansson, Ulf Andreasson, Henrik Zetterberg, Kaj Blennow and Johan Svensson. Cerebrospinal Fluid Biomarkers for Alzheimer's Disease: Diagnostic Performance in a Homogeneous Mono-Center Population. Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, 2011; DOI: 10.3233/JAD-2011-101878

Cite This Page:

University of Gothenburg. "More accurate diagnosis of Alzheimer's." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 20 April 2011. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/04/110419082652.htm>.
University of Gothenburg. (2011, April 20). More accurate diagnosis of Alzheimer's. ScienceDaily. Retrieved November 28, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/04/110419082652.htm
University of Gothenburg. "More accurate diagnosis of Alzheimer's." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/04/110419082652.htm (accessed November 28, 2014).

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