Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

First proof in patients of an improved 'magic bullet' for cancer detection and radio-therapy

Date:
September 13, 2011
Source:
Salk Institute
Summary:
Oncologists have long sought a powerful "magic bullet" that can find tumors wherever they hide in the body so that they can be imaged and then destroyed.

Oncologists have long sought a powerful "magic bullet" that can find tumors wherever they hide in the body so that they can be imaged and then destroyed. Until recently scientists accepted the notion that such an agent, an agonist, needed to enter and accumulate in the cancerous cells to act. An international research team has now shown in cancer patients that an investigational agent that sticks onto the surface of tumor cells without triggering internalization, an antagonist, may be safer and even more effective than agonists.

Related Articles


One of the Salk Institute's leading researchers, Dr. Jean Rivier, professor in The Clayton Foundation Laboratories for Peptide Biology and holder of the Frederik Paulsen Chair in Neurosciences and his Swiss collaborator, Dr. Jean Claude Reubi, University of Berne and Adjunct Professor at Salk, co-authored a pilot study, published in the September issue of the Journal of Nuclear Medicine, of five patients and demonstrated that their "antagonist," 111In-DOTA-BASS, outperformed the "agonist" agent, OctreoScan, that is widely used in the clinic to image neuroendocrine tumors bearing somatostatin receptors.

"This is the first proof of principle in humans that labeled peptide antagonists can effectively image tumors. Additional research suggests that we could one day use a different radioactive metal to effectively kill the tumors," said Dr. Rivier.

Dr. Reubi, a molecular pathologist, and Dr. Rivier, a chemist, collaborated in the design and selection of natIn-DOTA-BASS for human testing, and Dr. Helmut R. Maecke, a radio chemist, loaded DOTA-BASS with its radioactive marker and tested the compound before use in human. Afterward, the "first in man" study with the radioactive loaded DOTA-BASS was performed at the University Hospital in Freiburgby Drs. Damian Wild, Melpomeni Fani, Martin Behe, Ingo Brink, Helmut R. Maecke, and Wolfgang A. Weber.

The genesis of this study goes back to 1973, when a team of Salk researchers, which included Drs. Brazeau, Vale, Burgus, Rivier, and Roger Guillemin, a 1977 Nobel laureate, isolated and characterized somatostatin, a peptide produced by neuroendocrine glands. The scientists found that the normal function of somatostatin is to block the release of growth hormone throughout the body, which includes inhibiting the release of thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) from the thyroid.

Drs. Rivier, Reubi and their colleagues from Germany showed that 111In-DOTA-BASS bound to a greater number of somatostatin receptors on cancer cells than the agonist OctreoScan, and that it did accumulate in normal tissue (liver and kidney) to a lesser extent.

The prototype antagonist therapy has been revamped, and the version studied in the Journal of Nuclear Medicine publication, 111In-DOTA-BASS, detected 25 of 28 metastatic neuroendocrine tumors in the patients, whereas OctreoScan detected only 17.

In-DOTA-BASS has been licensed to a pharmaceutical company for clinical trial development, according to Rivier, who adds that other researchers are exploring an antagonist approach for other G-protein coupled receptors that are abundantly expressed on cancer cells.

The study was funded in part by the Swiss National Science Foundation (JCR).


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Salk Institute. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. D. Wild, M. Fani, M. Behe, I. Brink, J. E. F. Rivier, J. C. Reubi, H. R. Maecke, W. A. Weber. First Clinical Evidence That Imaging with Somatostatin Receptor Antagonists Is Feasible. Journal of Nuclear Medicine, 2011; 52 (9): 1412 DOI: 10.2967/jnumed.111.088922

Cite This Page:

Salk Institute. "First proof in patients of an improved 'magic bullet' for cancer detection and radio-therapy." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 13 September 2011. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/09/110912152909.htm>.
Salk Institute. (2011, September 13). First proof in patients of an improved 'magic bullet' for cancer detection and radio-therapy. ScienceDaily. Retrieved December 20, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/09/110912152909.htm
Salk Institute. "First proof in patients of an improved 'magic bullet' for cancer detection and radio-therapy." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/09/110912152909.htm (accessed December 20, 2014).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Health & Medicine News

Saturday, December 20, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

The Best Tips to Curb Holiday Carbs

The Best Tips to Curb Holiday Carbs

Buzz60 (Dec. 19, 2014) It's hard to resist those delicious but fattening carbs we all crave during the winter months, but there are some ways to stay satisfied without consuming the extra calories. Vanessa Freeman (@VanessaFreeTV) has the details. Video provided by Buzz60
Powered by NewsLook.com
Sierra Leone Bikers Spread the Message to Fight Ebola

Sierra Leone Bikers Spread the Message to Fight Ebola

AFP (Dec. 19, 2014) More than 100 motorcyclists hit the road to spread awareness messages about Ebola. Nearly 7,000 people have now died from the virus, almost all of them in west Africa, according to the World Health Organization. Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Researchers Test Colombian Village With High Alzheimer's Rates

Researchers Test Colombian Village With High Alzheimer's Rates

AFP (Dec. 19, 2014) In Yarumal, a village in N. Colombia, Alzheimer's has ravaged a disproportionately large number of families. A genetic "curse" that may pave the way for research on how to treat the disease that claims a new victim every four seconds. Duration: 02:42 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
The Best Protein-Filled Foods to Energize You for the New Year

The Best Protein-Filled Foods to Energize You for the New Year

Buzz60 (Dec. 19, 2014) The new year is coming and nothing will energize you more for 2015 than protein-filled foods. Fitness and nutrition expert John Basedow (@JohnBasedow) gives his favorite high protein foods that will help you build muscle, lose fat and have endless energy. Video provided by Buzz60
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins