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Older cancer survivor population to increase substantially, report predicts

Date:
October 10, 2011
Source:
American Association for Cancer Research
Summary:
Over the next decade, the population of cancer survivors over 65 years of age will increase by approximately 42 percent, according to a new report.

Over the next decade, the population of cancer survivors over 65 years of age will increase by approximately 42 percent.

"We can expect a dramatic increase in the number of older adults who are diagnosed with or carry a history of cancer," said Julia Rowland, Ph.D., director of the Office of Cancer Survivorship in the Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences at the National Cancer Institute (NCI). "Cancer is largely a disease of aging, so we're seeing yet another effect of the baby boom generation and we need to prepare for this increase."

Rowland's report is part of the special focus on cancer survivorship, published in the October issue of Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research. Rowland and colleagues analyzed data from the NCI Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results Program. This report on cancer survivorship statistics will be updated and published on an annual basis.

They found that in 1971, the year the National Cancer Act was signed, the survivor population was approximately 3 million, which increased to nearly 12 million in 2008, the last year data are available.

In 2008, 60 percent of the cancer survivors were at least 65 years old. The NCI projects this number will increase to 63 percent by 2020.

The most common diagnosis among cancer survivors includes female breast cancer (22 percent), prostate cancer (20 percent) and colorectal cancer (9 percent). Researchers attribute this high survival to improved detection and screening. Lung cancer, which is by far the most diagnosed cancer in men and women, is much lower in the survivor population at just 3 percent.

Rowland said the health care community needs to prepare for the coming wave of cancer survivors who will present some unique challenges. As a population, the number of oncologists and geriatric specialists is decreasing just as the need for these specialists is increasing.

"We may be fortunate in that the aging population is healthier than in previous generations, and new technologies could allow for better communication and follow-up," she said.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by American Association for Cancer Research. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. C. Parry, E. E. Kent, A. B. Mariotto, C. M. Alfano, J. H. Rowland. Cancer Survivors: A Booming Population. Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers & Prevention, 2011; 20 (10): 1996 DOI: 10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-11-0729

Cite This Page:

American Association for Cancer Research. "Older cancer survivor population to increase substantially, report predicts." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 10 October 2011. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/10/111006084332.htm>.
American Association for Cancer Research. (2011, October 10). Older cancer survivor population to increase substantially, report predicts. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 2, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/10/111006084332.htm
American Association for Cancer Research. "Older cancer survivor population to increase substantially, report predicts." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/10/111006084332.htm (accessed September 2, 2014).

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