Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Website security: Spot a bot to stop a botnet

Date:
May 1, 2012
Source:
Inderscience Publishers
Summary:
Computer scientists have developed a two-pronged algorithm that can detect the presence of a botnet on a computer network and block its malicious activities before it causes too much harm.

Computer scientists in India have developed a two-pronged algorithm that can detect the presence of a botnet on a computer network and block its malicious activities before it causes too much harm. The team describes details of the system in a forthcoming issue of the International Journal of Wireless and Mobile Computing.

One of the most significant threats faced by computer networks is from "bots." A bot is simply a program that runs on a computer without the owner's knowledge and carries out any of a number of tasks over the network and the wider internet. It can run the same tasks, such as sending emails or accessing a specific page on the internet, at a much higher rate than would be possible if a person were to carry out the task. A collection of bots in a network, used for malicious purposes, is a botnet and while they are often organized and run by a so-called botmaster there are bots that are available for hire for malicious and criminal activity.

Bots might be illicitly installed on computers in the home, schools, businesses, government buildings and other installations. They are usually carried into a particular computer through a malicious link on the internet, in an email or when a contaminated external storage device, such as a USB drive is attached to a computer that has no malware protection software installed.

Botnets are known to have been used to send mass emails, spam, numbering in the hundreds of millions, if not billions of deliveries. They have also been used in corporate spying, international surveillance and for carrying out attacks known as Distributed Denial of Service (DDoS) attacks, which can decommission whole computer networks by accessing their servers repeatedly and so blocking legitimate users.

Manoj Thakur of the Veermata Jijabai Technological Institute (VJTI), in Mumbai, India, and colleagues have developed a novel approach to detecting and combating bots. Their technique uses a two-pronged strategy involving a standalone and a network algorithm. The standalone algorithm runs independently on each node of the network and monitors active processes on the node. If it detects suspicious activity, it triggers the network algorithm. The network algorithm then analyzes the information being transferred to and from the hosts on the network to deduce whether or not the activity is due to a bot or a legitimate program on the system.

The standalone algorithm is heuristic in nature, the team says, which means it can spot previously unseen bot activity, whereas the network algorithm relies on network traffic analysis to carry out its detection. The two techniques working together can thus spot activity from known and unknown bots. This approach also has the advantage of reducing the number of false positives.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Inderscience Publishers. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Manoj Thakur et al. Detection and prevention of botnets and malware in an enterprise network. Int. J. Wireless and Mobile Computing, 2012, 5, 144-153

Cite This Page:

Inderscience Publishers. "Website security: Spot a bot to stop a botnet." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 1 May 2012. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/05/120501100029.htm>.
Inderscience Publishers. (2012, May 1). Website security: Spot a bot to stop a botnet. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 17, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/05/120501100029.htm
Inderscience Publishers. "Website security: Spot a bot to stop a botnet." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/05/120501100029.htm (accessed September 17, 2014).

Share This



More Computers & Math News

Wednesday, September 17, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

FBI Finishes $1 Billion Facial Recognition System

FBI Finishes $1 Billion Facial Recognition System

Newsy (Sep. 15, 2014) The FBI announced it plans to make its Next Generation Identification System available to law enforcement, but some privacy advocates are worried. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
A+ for Apple iPhone Pre-Sales

A+ for Apple iPhone Pre-Sales

Reuters - Business Video Online (Sep. 15, 2014) Apple says it received a record 4 million first-day pre-orders for its new iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus, pushing delivery dates into October. Bobbi Rebell reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Microsoft to Buy 'Minecraft' Maker for $2.5B

Microsoft to Buy 'Minecraft' Maker for $2.5B

AP (Sep. 15, 2014) Microsoft will acquire the maker of the long-running hit game Minecraft for $2.5 billion as the company continues to invest in its Xbox gaming platform and looks to grab attention on mobile phones. (Sept. 15) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Manufacturer Prints 3-D Car In Record Time

Manufacturer Prints 3-D Car In Record Time

Newsy (Sep. 15, 2014) Automobile manufacturer Local Motors created a drivable electric car using a 3-D printer. Printing the body only took 44 hours. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

    Environment News

      Technology News



      Save/Print:
      Share:

      Free Subscriptions


      Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

      Get Social & Mobile


      Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

      Have Feedback?


      Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
      Mobile: iPhone Android Web
      Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
      Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
      Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins