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Scientists devise new strategy to destroy multiple myeloma

Date:
August 14, 2012
Source:
Virginia Commonwealth University
Summary:
Researchers are reporting promising results from laboratory and animal experiments involving a new combination therapy for multiple myeloma, the second most common form of blood cancer.

Researchers at Virginia Commonwealth University Massey Cancer Center are reporting promising results from laboratory and animal experiments involving a new combination therapy for multiple myeloma, the second most common form of blood cancer.

The study published online in the journal Cancer Research details a dramatic increase in multiple myeloma cell death caused by a combination of the drugs obatoclax and flavopiridol. The researchers, led by Steven Grant, M.D., Shirley Carter Olsson and Sture Gordon Olsson Chair in Oncology Research, associate director for translational research, program co-leader and member of Developmental Therapeutics and member of the Cancer Cell Signaling program at VCU Massey Cancer Center, found that the two drugs worked together through different mechanisms to promote a form of cell suicide known as apoptosis.

"There is an urgent need for curative therapies for multiple myeloma," says Grant. "Our hope is that this research will lay the foundation for new and more effective treatments for patients with multiple myeloma and potentially other blood cancers for which adequate therapies are lacking."

Obatoclax is an experimental agent currently being investigated in various forms of blood cancers. It works by disabling proteins that prevent cancer cells from undergoing apoptosis. Flavopiridol is a member of a class of agents known as a cyclin-dependant kinase (CDK) inhibitors, and blocks the growth of cancer cells in addition to reducing levels of anti-apoptotic proteins.

In laboratory experiments, the novel drug combination dramatically increased multiple myeloma cell death. These results were confirmed in animal models where the drugs significantly improved the survival of immune-compromised mice with human multiple myeloma. An unexpected effect was also observed -- flavopiridol, in addition to reducing levels of anti-apoptotic proteins, significantly increased the expression of apoptosis-inducing proteins such as Bim, a protein shown in previous studies to trigger cell death.

"This research builds on nearly a decade of work carried out by our laboratory that focuses on manipulating mechanisms that lead to apoptosis in hematological malignancies," says Grant. "Our findings could have immediate implications for the design of clinical trials using combinations of these types of drugs. In fact, plans to develop such a trial at Massey are currently underway."

Because the findings showed synergism between these two classes of drugs, the researchers plan to test other clinically-relevant CDK inhibitors in combination with obatoclax for multiple myeloma.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Virginia Commonwealth University. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. S. Chen, Y. Dai, X.-Y. Pei, J. Myers, L. Wang, L. B. Kramer, M. Garnett, D. M. Schwartz, F. Su, G. L. Simmons, J. D. Richey, D. G. Larsen, P. Dent, R. Z. Orlowski, S. Grant. CDK Inhibitors Upregulate BH3-Only Proteins to Sensitize Human Myeloma Cells to BH3 Mimetic Therapies. Cancer Research, 2012; DOI: 10.1158/0008-5472.CAN-12-1118

Cite This Page:

Virginia Commonwealth University. "Scientists devise new strategy to destroy multiple myeloma." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 14 August 2012. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/08/120814110959.htm>.
Virginia Commonwealth University. (2012, August 14). Scientists devise new strategy to destroy multiple myeloma. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 1, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/08/120814110959.htm
Virginia Commonwealth University. "Scientists devise new strategy to destroy multiple myeloma." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/08/120814110959.htm (accessed October 1, 2014).

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