Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Standardized testing creates 'toxic environment' in schools, professor says

Date:
April 16, 2013
Source:
Southeastern Louisiana University
Summary:
Standardized testing has facilitated “an incredibly toxic environment in our schools and in our discourse about education, ultimately turning schools from learning centers to testing factories,” according to a professor. That emphasis on standardized testing has corrupted the focus on learning, turning school-aged children into “experimental pawns,” he says.

With standardized testing finally coming to an end in most districts, schools across the nation are exhaling a collective breath of relief.

Related Articles


After weeks of rigorous test preparation, anxiety-inducing practice, pep rallies and other contrived motivational activities, teachers and students are finally being liberated from the standardized testing rituals that have become an annual rite of passage each spring.

To Southeastern Louisiana University Education Professor James D. Kirylo, standardized testing has facilitated "an incredibly toxic environment in our schools and in our discourse about education, ultimately turning schools from learning centers to testing factories."

That emphasis on standardized testing has corrupted the focus on learning, he added, turning school-aged children into "experimental pawns."

"No doubt, the stakes are perversely high," said Kirylo, who writes prolifically about schools and education. "These singular tests determine, presumably, whether or not students are learning; whether or not teachers are effective; whether or not students will be subjected to boring skill and drill summer sessions; whether or not they will pass on to the next grade level; and ultimately how schools are rated. Likewise, teachers and principals will be faced with either job insecurity or celebrated with public praise."

According to Kirylo, the emphasis on standardized testing has resulted in students being objectified and curricula becoming disturbingly narrowed.

"We're in an environment where conversations among policy-makers, politicians and opportunists are talking about school reform using the language of competition, product, performance and outcome," said Kirylo, last year's recipient of Southeastern's Award for Excellence in Research. "We have created a system that inherently creates winners and losers."

That approach generates an atmosphere geared to winning at any costs, including the strong possibility of cheating. Kirylo said it should be no surprise that something like the recently discovered elaborate standardized testing cheating scheme in Atlanta occurred. That fraudulent activity involved the participation of teachers, administrators and a nationally recognized superintendent.

"Cheating is quite common and widespread," he added. "We all want to win, and many will seek to win by any means necessary. This is true in the history of sports, the corporate world and now in education."

Kirylo, a former Louisiana Elementary School Teacher of the Year, said many in positions of power are so focused on raising test scores, they lose sight of the ultimate goal of whether or not children are learning.

"As a result, there is no authentic concern about addressing the social economic, emotional or psychological disposition children bring to school; no care in finding solutions for over-crowded classrooms, and no care whether these tests are appropriate," he explained. "There is only one goal in mind, and that is to win; winning means high test scores, monetary awards and recognition.

"Schools don't exist to win, they exist to be places of learning," Kirylo added. "The task of the educator is not to compete with other educators, but to cooperate, collaborate and work together to lift all children up. Our children don't attend school to pass a test; they attend school to learn. Unfortunately, our sick educational climate continues to inappropriately test our children out of learning."

Kirylo serves on the editorial boards of The Association for Childhood Education International and the Journal of Curriculum and Pedagogy.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Southeastern Louisiana University. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Southeastern Louisiana University. "Standardized testing creates 'toxic environment' in schools, professor says." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 16 April 2013. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/04/130416102122.htm>.
Southeastern Louisiana University. (2013, April 16). Standardized testing creates 'toxic environment' in schools, professor says. ScienceDaily. Retrieved February 27, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/04/130416102122.htm
Southeastern Louisiana University. "Standardized testing creates 'toxic environment' in schools, professor says." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/04/130416102122.htm (accessed February 27, 2015).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Mind & Brain News

Friday, February 27, 2015

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

The Best Foods to Battle Stress

The Best Foods to Battle Stress

Buzz60 (Feb. 26, 2015) If you&apos;re dealing with anxiety, there are a few foods that can help. Krystin Goodwin (@krystingoodwin) has the best foods to tame stress. Video provided by Buzz60
Powered by NewsLook.com
Sleeping Too Much Or Too Little Might Increase Stroke Risk

Sleeping Too Much Or Too Little Might Increase Stroke Risk

Newsy (Feb. 26, 2015) People who sleep more than eight hours per night are 45 percent more likely to have a stroke, according to a University of Cambridge study. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Mayor Says District of Columbia to Go Ahead With Pot Legalization

Mayor Says District of Columbia to Go Ahead With Pot Legalization

Reuters - News Video Online (Feb. 25, 2015) Washington&apos;s mayor says the District of Columbia will move forward with marijuana legalization, despite pushback from Congress. Rough Cut (no reporter narration). Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Marijuana Nowhere Near As Deadly As Alcohol: Study

Marijuana Nowhere Near As Deadly As Alcohol: Study

Newsy (Feb. 25, 2015) A new study says marijuana is about 114 times less deadly than alcohol. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins