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Women's jobs are poorer paid, less flexible, more stressful

Date:
March 4, 2014
Source:
SAGE Publications
Summary:
Women's jobs are poorer paid, less flexible, more stressful, and offer fewer promotion opportunities than men's, a large international study has found. Researchers say that the results disprove the theory that women have voluntarily traded less high-powered jobs in order to have more flexibility for their responsibilities at home. The research "does not support the claim that women enjoy a more relaxed and convenient work environment to compensate for their lack of achievement," the authors conclude.

Women's jobs are poorer paid, less flexible, more stressful, and offer fewer promotion opportunities than men's, a large international study has found.

Researchers say that the results disprove the theory that women have voluntarily traded less high-powered jobs in order to have more flexibility for their responsibilities at home.

Professor Haya Stier, of Tel Aviv University, and Professor Meir Yaish, University of Haifa, analyzed survey data on the working lives of 8,500 men and 9,000 women in 27 industrialized countries, including the UK.

In a paper published in the journal Work, Employment and Society they looked at how those surveyed responded to questions about their jobs, and found:

  • When asked if they or their employer decided at what time they started and ended work, how they organized their schedule, and whether they took time off work, men scored 0.148 points (15%) higher.
  • On a scale of 1-5, on average men gave answers that were 0.215 points higher (8%) than women's when asked about their income and opportunities for promotion.
  • On a scale of 1-5, on average men gave answers that were 0.159 points (5%) lower than women's when asked about how stressful and exhausting the work was.
  • Men gave answers that were 0.084 (2 %) points higher than women's when asked about how interesting they found their work, how independently they could work and how much scope they had to improve their skills.
  • Men gave answers that were 0.062 points (2%) lower than women's when asked about job security.

Only in the area of physical condition did men score their work worse, saying it was more physically arduous and dangerous, by 0.275 points (8%).

"The findings show that women lag behind men on most dimensions of job quality," say the researchers. "This result runs counter to the expectation that women's occupations compensate for their low wages and limited opportunities for promotion by providing better employment conditions.

"The findings indicate that women enjoy hardly any advantage over men in the labor market. Women lag behind men on most employment dimensions: their jobs offer lower salaries and fewer opportunities for advancement, but also lower job security, worse job content, less time autonomy and worse emotional conditions."

The research "does not support the claim that women enjoy a more relaxed and convenient work environment to compensate for their lack of achievement."

However the researchers also found that the more women in a profession or trade the closer their working conditions came to men's in most aspects of work.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by SAGE Publications. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. H. Stier, M. Yaish. Occupational segregation and gender inequality in job quality: a multi-level approach. Work, Employment & Society, 2014; DOI: 10.1177/0950017013510758

Cite This Page:

SAGE Publications. "Women's jobs are poorer paid, less flexible, more stressful." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 4 March 2014. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/03/140304125835.htm>.
SAGE Publications. (2014, March 4). Women's jobs are poorer paid, less flexible, more stressful. ScienceDaily. Retrieved August 28, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/03/140304125835.htm
SAGE Publications. "Women's jobs are poorer paid, less flexible, more stressful." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/03/140304125835.htm (accessed August 28, 2014).

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