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Preschoolers can outsmart college students at figuring out gizmos

Date:
March 6, 2014
Source:
University of California - Berkeley
Summary:
Preschoolers can be smarter than college students at figuring out how unusual toys and gadgets work because they're more flexible and less biased than adults in their ideas about cause and effect, according to new research.

A new study shows children can sometimes outsmart grownups when it comes to figuring out how gadgets work because they’re less biased in their ideas about cause and effect.
Credit: Image courtesy of University of California - Berkeley

Preschoolers can be smarter than college students at figuring out how unusual toys and gadgets work because they're more flexible and less biased than adults in their ideas about cause and effect, according to new research from the University of California, Berkeley, and the University of Edinburgh.

The findings suggest that technology and innovation can benefit from the exploratory learning and probabilistic reasoning skills that come naturally to young children, many of whom are learning to use smartphones even before they can tie their shoelaces. The findings also build upon the researchers' efforts to use children's cognitive smarts to teach machines to learn in more human ways.

"As far as we know, this is the first study examining whether children can learn abstract cause and effect relationships, and comparing them to adults," said UC Berkeley developmental psychologist Alison Gopnik, senior author of the paper published online in the journal, Cognition.

Using a game they call "Blickets," the researchers looked at how 106 preschoolers (aged 4 and 5) and 170 college undergrads figured out a gizmo that works in an unusual way. They did this by placing clay shapes (cubes, pyramids, cylinders, etc), on a red-topped box to see which of the widgets -- individually or in combination -- could light up the box and play music. The shapes that activated the machine were called "blickets."

What separated the young players from the adult players was their response to changing evidence in the blicket demonstrations. For example, unusual combinations could make the machine go, and children caught on to that rule, while the adults tended to focus on which individual blocks activated the machine even in the face of changing evidence.

"The kids got it. They figured out that the machine might work in this unusual way and so that you should put both blocks on together. But the best and brightest students acted as if the machine would always follow the common and obvious rule, even when we showed them that it might work differently," wrote Gopnik in her forthcoming column in The Wall Street Journal.

Overall, the youngsters were more likely to entertain unlikely possibilities to figure out "blicketness." This confirmed the researchers' hypothesis that preschoolers and kindergartners instinctively follow Bayesian logic, a statistical model that draws inferences by calculating the probability of possible outcomes.

"One big question, looking forward, is what makes children more flexible learners -- are they just free from the preconceptions that adults have, or are they fundamentally more flexible or exploratory in how they see the world?" said Christopher Lucas, lead author of the paper and a lecturer at the University of Edinburgh. "Regardless, children have a lot to teach us about learning."

Other co-authors of the study are Thomas Griffiths and Sophie Bridgers of the UC Berkeley Department of Psychology.

A new study shows children can sometimes outsmart grownups when it comes to figuring out how gadgets work because they're less biased in their ideas about cause and effect. (Video by Roxanne Majasdjian and Philip Ebiner) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bHQ0DemKcEA


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University of California - Berkeley. The original article was written by Yasmin Anwar. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Christopher G. Lucas, Sophie Bridgers, Thomas L. Griffiths, Alison Gopnik. When children are better (or at least more open-minded) learners than adults: Developmental differences in learning the forms of causal relationships. Cognition, 2014; 131 (2): 284 DOI: 10.1016/j.cognition.2013.12.010

Cite This Page:

University of California - Berkeley. "Preschoolers can outsmart college students at figuring out gizmos." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 6 March 2014. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/03/140306191530.htm>.
University of California - Berkeley. (2014, March 6). Preschoolers can outsmart college students at figuring out gizmos. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 30, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/03/140306191530.htm
University of California - Berkeley. "Preschoolers can outsmart college students at figuring out gizmos." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/03/140306191530.htm (accessed September 30, 2014).

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