Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Body's fatty folds may help fight kidney failure

Date:
March 13, 2014
Source:
American Society of Nephrology (ASN)
Summary:
In a new study, it was observed that in rats with kidney disease, functioning of the kidney improved when the organ was fused with the omentum, a fatty fold of tissue that lies close to the kidney and is a rich source of stem cells. The findings suggest that stem cells from a chronic kidney disease patient’s own omentum may help heal diseased kidneys without the need for an outside source of cells.

A fatty fold of tissue within the abdomen that is a rich source of stem cells can help heal diseased kidneys when fused to the organs, according to a study conducted in rats. The findings, which appear in an upcoming issue of the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology (JASN), suggest that stem cells from within a chronic kidney disease patient's own abdomen could be used to preserve and possibly improve kidney function.

Although adult stem cells have shown promise in treating experimental acute kidney diseases, it's unknown whether they might also alleviate chronic kidney diseases. Such a treatment strategy would typically involve injecting cells frequently over a period of many months and years because stem cells do not survive in the body for more than a few days after injection.

Ashok Singh, PhD (John Stroger, Jr Hospital of Cook County) and his colleagues attempted to overcome this hurdle in rats with kidney disease by connecting the omentum, a fatty fold of tissue that lies close to the kidney and is a rich source of stem cells, to the kidney. "This maneuver allowed us to permanently lodge stem cells in contact with the diseased kidney," explained Dr. Singh.

After 12 weeks, the omentum remained fused to the kidney, which showed signs of improved function. "The progression of chronic kidney disease was slowed due to the continuous migration of stem cells from the omentum to the diseased kidney, resulting in healing of the kidney," said Dr. Singh.

The results indicate that stem cells indeed possess the power to slow or even reverse chronic kidney disease, provided the cells are allowed to remain in the diseased kidney for a prolonged period of time.

"Attaching the omentum, a supposedly useless organ lying close to the kidney, to the diseased kidney could be put into practice after some more developmental work," said Dr. Singh. "By this technique, patients would be using their own stem cells lying in the omentum to cure their kidneys without depending on outside sources of stem cells."

In an accompanying editorial, Christof Westenfelder, MD (University of Utah) noted that the data reported by Dr. Singh and his colleagues are "novel and scientifically interesting." After pointing to some limitations to the applicability of this technology to clinical CKD, he stated that "further studies are needed to fully define the complex nature of the omentum's ability to heal injured organs and to establish its potential utility in patients with renal diseases."


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by American Society of Nephrology (ASN). Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. I. Garcia-Gomez, N. Pancholi, J. Patel, K. P. Gudehithlu, P. Sethupathi, P. Hart, G. Dunea, J. A. L. Arruda, A. K. Singh. Activated Omentum Slows Progression of CKD. Journal of the American Society of Nephrology, 2014; DOI: 10.1681/ASN.2013040387

Cite This Page:

American Society of Nephrology (ASN). "Body's fatty folds may help fight kidney failure." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 13 March 2014. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/03/140313172933.htm>.
American Society of Nephrology (ASN). (2014, March 13). Body's fatty folds may help fight kidney failure. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 23, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/03/140313172933.htm
American Society of Nephrology (ASN). "Body's fatty folds may help fight kidney failure." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/03/140313172933.htm (accessed July 23, 2014).

Share This




More Health & Medicine News

Wednesday, July 23, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Idaho Boy Helps Brother With Disabilities Complete Triathlon

Idaho Boy Helps Brother With Disabilities Complete Triathlon

Newsy (July 23, 2014) An 8-year-old boy helped his younger brother, who has a rare genetic condition that's confined him to a wheelchair, finish a triathlon. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Stone Fruit Listeria Scare Causes Sweeping Recall

Stone Fruit Listeria Scare Causes Sweeping Recall

Newsy (July 22, 2014) The Wawona Packing Company has issued a voluntary recall on the stone fruit it distributes due to a possible Listeria outbreak. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Huge Schizophrenia Study Finds Dozens Of New Genetic Causes

Huge Schizophrenia Study Finds Dozens Of New Genetic Causes

Newsy (July 22, 2014) The 83 new genetic markers could open dozens of new avenues for schizophrenia treatment research. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
CDC Head Concerned About a Post-Antibiotic Era

CDC Head Concerned About a Post-Antibiotic Era

AP (July 22, 2014) Sounding alarms about the growing threat of antibiotic resistance, CDC Director Tom Frieden warned Tuesday if the global community does not confront the problem soon, the world will be living in a devastating post-antibiotic era. (July 22) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins