Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Young people in developing countries need specially customized suicide prevention programs

Date:
May 12, 2014
Source:
Ume universitet
Summary:
It is vital that both cultural and gender differences are taken into account when drawing up programs aimed at preventing suicide among young people in low- to middle-income countries. "Suicide among young people is a global health problem. There is a lack of knowledge and understanding about the factors that affect the risk of suicide and about the importance of different suicidal expressions in many low and middle-income countries. In order to implement effective preventative measures it is necessary to study the differences in suicidal expressions between different countries," says the author.

It is vital that both cultural and gender differences are taken into account when drawing up programs aimed at preventing suicide among young people in low- to middle-income countries. This is the conclusion of a doctoral thesis from Sweden's Ume University.

Related Articles


"Suicide among young people is a global health problem. There is a lack of knowledge and understanding about the factors that affect the risk of suicide and about the importance of different suicidal expressions in many low and middle-income countries. In order to implement effective preventative measures it is necessary to study the differences in suicidal expressions between different countries," says Bhoomikumar Jegannathan, PhD student at the Department of Clinical Sciences, Ume University, who will be defending his thesis on the subject.

He says that many young people in Cambodia have challenges in negotiating between old traditions and modern life. Besides, there is an ambiguity within Buddhism when it comes to the understanding of suicide; cultural influences from other countries may be contributing to an increase in suicidal tendencies among young people. Conflicts with parents can put young people in a difficult situation and some view suicide as a means to escape from these difficulties.

In his thesis, Bhoomikumar Jegannathan, who is also child psychiatrist in the Kandal province of Cambodia, has conducted questionnaire surveys where school students can anonymously state their mental health status, life experiences and whether they had ever had a death wish, suicidal thoughts, or if they have ever planned or attempted suicide. In one study, he also compared different expressions of suicide in Cambodian and Nicaraguan youths. Nicaraguan teenagers reported more suicidal expressions than Cambodian teenagers, on the contrary the Cambodian teenagers reported more mental health problems than Nicaraguans. Suicidal problems were associated with mental health problems in Nicaragua, unlike in Cambodia which shows that the associated factors differ from culture to culture.

His thesis contains a study in which he investigates ways in which the educational program Life Skills Education can be used to influence the mental health of young people and their ability to handle life's situations. The program is made up of six modules and is taught by specially trained teachers.

"These results show the importance of taking cultural and gender-specific differences into account when preparing suicide prevention programs. It is also vital that we analyze what triggers these suicidal expressions among teenagers. It has been established, however, that school-based programs create possibilities for improving mental health and preventing suicide among young people in Cambodia," says Bhoomikumar Jegannathan.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Ume universitet. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Ume universitet. "Young people in developing countries need specially customized suicide prevention programs." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 12 May 2014. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/05/140512101521.htm>.
Ume universitet. (2014, May 12). Young people in developing countries need specially customized suicide prevention programs. ScienceDaily. Retrieved February 26, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/05/140512101521.htm
Ume universitet. "Young people in developing countries need specially customized suicide prevention programs." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/05/140512101521.htm (accessed February 26, 2015).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Mind & Brain News

Thursday, February 26, 2015

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Mayor Says District of Columbia to Go Ahead With Pot Legalization

Mayor Says District of Columbia to Go Ahead With Pot Legalization

Reuters - News Video Online (Feb. 25, 2015) Washington&apos;s mayor says the District of Columbia will move forward with marijuana legalization, despite pushback from Congress. Rough Cut (no reporter narration). Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Marijuana Nowhere Near As Deadly As Alcohol: Study

Marijuana Nowhere Near As Deadly As Alcohol: Study

Newsy (Feb. 25, 2015) A new study says marijuana is about 114 times less deadly than alcohol. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Researchers Replace Damaged Hands With Prostheses

Researchers Replace Damaged Hands With Prostheses

Newsy (Feb. 25, 2015) Scientists in Austria have been able to fit patients who&apos;ve lost the use of a hand with bionic prostheses the patients control with their minds. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Couple Leaving Everything in Will to Pet Monkey

Couple Leaving Everything in Will to Pet Monkey

Buzz60 (Feb. 20, 2015) After being kicked out of their families for marrying against their wishes, an Indian couple is leaving their house, land and savings to their pet monkey when they die. Patrick Jones (@Patrick_E_Jones) explains. Video provided by Buzz60
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins