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ZBLAN Research Takes Step Forward

Date:
June 4, 1997
Source:
Space Sciences Laboratory -- NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center
Summary:
Research into ZBLAN, a material with the potential to become the optical fiber cable of the 21st century, has taken a step forward with the acceptance of space-based research for publication in the Journal of Materials Research.


Discovered by a team of French researchers in 1974, ZBLAN is named after the heavy metals found in
the chemical composition of the material: zirconium, barium, lanthanum, aluminum, and sodium (chemical
symbol "Na"). ZBLAN is a member of the heavy metal fluoride family of glasses, and has promising
applications in fiber optics. It is highly transparent in the infrared region of the electromagnetic
spectrum, thus opening an entirely new energy range for optical fiber communications, sensing, and
technology development. But to develop this new material fully will require some more hard science be
done.


In theory, one should be able to make a ZBLAN optical fiber cable that has the capability to carry more
than 100 times the amount of data carried by today's traditional silica-based optical fiber cables. In
practice, however, the best that has been achieved has only been about 1/5 of current cables. "This is
primarily because of the fact that when you make ZBLAN on the ground, it has this nasty tendency to
crystallize - to come out of its glass-like state - which severely degrades its optical properties,"
commented Tucker.






The two pictures accompanying this release demonstrate this. ZBLAN on the left, made on Earth in a one-gravity environment, shows a great deal of non-uniformity and inhomogeneities due to its crystalline state. By contrast, the ZBLAN on the right was made aboard a Conquest-1 suborbital rocket flight. Its glassy nature is readily visible, as are some bubbles that formed when the sample inadvertently came in contact
with the container.


"It's really fascinating stuff," remarked Tucker. "Most of my colleagues perform experiments in space in
order to make very high-quality crystals, but ZBLAN doesn't crystallize."


Potential areas of application for this material include medical surgery and cauterization, temperature
monitoring, infrared imaging, fiber-optic lasers, optical power transmission, and a host of other areas. A
recent marketing survey indicated that the annual impact of ZBLAN on the economy might total as much
as nearly $8 billion.


"But before we get there, we've got a lot of hard science to do first," said Tucker. "We really have to get
to the physical understanding of why ZBLAN behaves the way it does, and what makes it stay in the
glass state in microgravity, as opposed to crystallize like it does on the ground."


(The images referred to in this text may be found at http://www.ssl.msfc.nasa.gov/newhome/headlines/msad03jun97_1.htm)


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Space Sciences Laboratory -- NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Space Sciences Laboratory -- NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center. "ZBLAN Research Takes Step Forward." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 4 June 1997. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1997/06/970604072441.htm>.
Space Sciences Laboratory -- NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center. (1997, June 4). ZBLAN Research Takes Step Forward. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 23, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1997/06/970604072441.htm
Space Sciences Laboratory -- NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center. "ZBLAN Research Takes Step Forward." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1997/06/970604072441.htm (accessed October 23, 2014).

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