Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Meeting On Viral Origins Of Psychiatric Conditions

Date:
September 30, 1997
Source:
Johns Hopkins Children's Center
Summary:
The Stanley Neurovirology Laboratory at Johns Hopkins hosts the third annual symposium examining the role viruses may play in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. October 23-25, Bethesda, Md.

The Stanley Neurovirology Laboratory at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine will host the Third Annual Symposium on the Neurovirology and Neuroimmunology of Schizophrenia and Bipolar Disorder on October 23-25 in Bethesda, Md.

The meeting brings together researchers from many fields who are interested in the role that viruses may play in the development of these disorders. Last year's meeting included researchers from the U.S., Canada, Finland, Japan, Sweden, Italy, Poland, Israel, Russia, and Jamaica.

"There have been questions about the viral origins of these conditions for nearly a century," says Robert Yolken, M.D., who heads the laboratory and is the director of the Division of Infectious Diseases at the Johns Hopkins Children's Center. "After the influenza epidemic in 1918, doctors noticed symptoms of schizophrenia and bipolar disorder in some of the patients recovering from the flu. But so far we don't have a clear handle on how a virus could lead to these types of neuropsychiatric disorders."

Subjects at this year's meeting include the epidemiology of schizophrenia and bipolar disorder; viruses as triggers for immune dysfunction; antiviral properties of antipsychotic drugs; the effects of viruses on neurotransmitters; molecular virology, and viral models for central nervous system function and pathology. The meeting will be held at the Bethesda Marriott, 5151 Pooks Hill Rd., from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. There is no registration fee. Press can pre-register or get more information by calling Nancy Volkers at (410) 223-1747 or e-mailing nvolkers@welchlink.welch.jhu.edu. The Stanley Laboratory is funded by the Theodore and Vada Stanley Foundation. The lab is online at www.stanleylab.org.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Johns Hopkins Children's Center. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Johns Hopkins Children's Center. "Meeting On Viral Origins Of Psychiatric Conditions." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 30 September 1997. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1997/09/970930131957.htm>.
Johns Hopkins Children's Center. (1997, September 30). Meeting On Viral Origins Of Psychiatric Conditions. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 19, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1997/09/970930131957.htm
Johns Hopkins Children's Center. "Meeting On Viral Origins Of Psychiatric Conditions." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1997/09/970930131957.htm (accessed September 19, 2014).

Share This



More Mind & Brain News

Friday, September 19, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Food Addiction Might Be Caused By PTSD

Food Addiction Might Be Caused By PTSD

Newsy (Sep. 18, 2014) New research shows that women who suffer from PTSD are three times more likely to develop a food addiction. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Corporal Punishment on Decline, Debate Renews

Corporal Punishment on Decline, Debate Renews

AP (Sep. 16, 2014) Corporal punishment in the United States is on the decline, but there is renewed debate over its use after Minnesota Vikings running back Adrian Peterson was charged with child abuse. (Sept. 16) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
FDA Eyes Skin Shocks Used at Mass. School

FDA Eyes Skin Shocks Used at Mass. School

AP (Sep. 15, 2014) The FDA is considering whether to ban devices used by the Judge Rotenberg Educational Center in Canton, Massachusetts, the only place in the country known to use electrical skin shocks as aversive conditioning for aggressive patients. (Sept. 15) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Shocker: Journalists Are Utterly Addicted To Coffee

Shocker: Journalists Are Utterly Addicted To Coffee

Newsy (Sep. 13, 2014) A U.K. survey found that journalists consumed the most amount of coffee, but that's only the tip of the coffee-related statistics iceberg. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins