Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Energy Secretary Richardson To Install Final Magnet In New Fermilab Accelerator

Date:
September 23, 1998
Source:
Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory
Summary:
Secretary of Energy Bill Richardson will help usher in a new era in physics at the energy frontier when he takes a wrench to four bolts at the Department of Energy's Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory on Thursday, September 24.

Batavia, Ill.--Secretary of Energy Bill Richardson will help usher in a new era in physics at the energy frontier when he takes a wrench to four bolts at the Department of Energy's Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory on Thursday, September 24.

Richardson will tighten the last four bolts on the final 20-ton dipole magnet -- one of 432 electromagnets, each 30 feet long, connected in a two-mile underground ring -- to be installed in Fermilab's new Main Injector Accelerator, a six-year, $229 million construction project. The new accelerator will inject high-energy protons into Fermilab's Tevatron, more than tripling the scientific capability of the world's most powerful particle accelerator. By creating trillions of high-energy collisions between subatomic particles moving at nearly light speed, the Tevatron allows scientists from across the U.S. and around the world to study the structure of matter at the smallest scale ever observed by human beings.

"I am proud that the Department of Energy is playing such a prominent and leading role in the science of high-energy physics," Richardson said. "Fermilab's new Main Injector will open up extraordinary new opportunities for discovery in this basic field of research, not only for scientists from the United States but for the international physics community. Through projects like the Main Injector, the Department is committed to keeping the U.S. among world leaders in particle physics research."

The Department of Energy funds more than 90 percent of all federally supported U.S. research in high-energy physics, including the building and operating of large accelerator laboratories like Fermilab, 30 miles west of Chicago. Paradoxically, the smaller the particles being observed, the larger the tools scientists must use to study them; and particle accelerators are the largest scientific instruments ever built. The scale of these instruments long ago outgrew the resources of single research universities to build and operate. Fermilab's Tevatron, four miles in circumference, is one of only a handful of particle accelerators in the U.S., Europe and Japan. University physicists and their students use these federally funded facilities to carry out experiments that unlock the secrets of the fundamental structure of matter.

When the new Main Injector begins operating early next year, it will greatly increase the number of high-energy particle collisions produced by the Tevatron, heightening its potential for revealing new physics insights. Thus the installation of the final Main Injector magnet marks a major milestone for Fermilab.

"We have looked forward to this day for a long time," said Main Injector Project Manager and Fermilab physicist Stephen Holmes. "Many people have worked hard to finish the Main Injector on time and on budget. With the last magnet in place, our sense of accomplishment will be exceeded only by our anticipation of the new science that this accelerator will deliver."

After tightening the final bolts, Richardson will join in a longstanding high-energy-physics tradition of celebrating the installation of the last magnet in a particle accelerator. He will add his signature to those of Holmes and hundreds of others who helped build the new accelerator, on a board titled "Fermilab Main Injector. Last Magnet Installed September 24, 1998."

Fermilab is operated by Universities Research Association, Inc. under contract with the U.S. Department of Energy.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. "Energy Secretary Richardson To Install Final Magnet In New Fermilab Accelerator." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 23 September 1998. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1998/09/980923073634.htm>.
Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. (1998, September 23). Energy Secretary Richardson To Install Final Magnet In New Fermilab Accelerator. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 31, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1998/09/980923073634.htm
Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. "Energy Secretary Richardson To Install Final Magnet In New Fermilab Accelerator." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1998/09/980923073634.htm (accessed July 31, 2014).

Share This




More Matter & Energy News

Thursday, July 31, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Britain Testing Driverless Cars on Roadways

Britain Testing Driverless Cars on Roadways

AP (July 30, 2014) British officials said on Wednesday that driverless cars will be tested on roads in as many as three cities in a trial program set to begin in January. Officials said the tests will last up to three years. (July 30) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
7 Ways to Use Toothpaste: Howdini Hacks

7 Ways to Use Toothpaste: Howdini Hacks

Howdini (July 30, 2014) Fresh breath and clean teeth are great, but have you ever thought, "my toothpaste could be doing more". Well, it can! Lots of things! Howdini has 7 new uses for this household staple. Video provided by Howdini
Powered by NewsLook.com
Amid Drought, UCLA Sees Only Water

Amid Drought, UCLA Sees Only Water

AP (July 30, 2014) A ruptured 93-year-old water main left the UCLA campus awash in 8 million gallons of water in the middle of California's worst drought in decades. (July 30) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Smartphone Powered Paper Plane Debuts at Airshow

Smartphone Powered Paper Plane Debuts at Airshow

AP (July 30, 2014) Smartphone powered paper airplane that was popular on crowdfunding website KickStarter makes its debut at Wisconsin airshow (July 30) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins