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Altered Brain Chemistry In Bulimia Nervosa Patients Persists After Recovery, According To UPMC Researchers

Date:
October 15, 1998
Source:
University Of Pittsburgh Medical Center
Summary:
Researchers at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center's (UPMC) Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic have found evidence supporting the possibility that an alteration of brain chemistry contributes to the development of bulimia nervosa and persists even after recovery from the disorder.

New Findings Suggest A Biological Cause For Eating Disorders

PITTSBURGH, Oct. 14 -- Researchers at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center's (UPMC) Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic have found evidence supporting the possibility that an alteration of brain chemistry contributes to the development of bulimia nervosa and persists even after recovery from the disorder.

The UPMC study, authored by Walter H. Kaye, M.D., professor of psychiatry, appears in the October issue of Archives of General Psychiatry.

Women with bulimia nervosa, when bingeing and purging, are known to have alterations of brain serotonin activity and mood as well as obsessions with perfectionism. Serotonin is a neurotransmitter that helps regulate mood. This study found that these alterations and symptoms persisted after recovery from bulimia nervosa, suggesting that they are not merely a consequence of abnormal eating behaviors. Theoretically, altered serotonin activity could cause anxious and obsessive behaviors and affect the control of appetite and thus contribute to a vulnerability to develop bulimia nervosa.

"The development of an eating disorder is often attributed to the effects of our cultural environment, such as the mass media, which places a heavy emphasis on slimness. But while all women are exposed to these cultural mores, only a small percentage develop an eating disorder. Our study may have identified a biological risk factor that plays a part in deciding who develops a disorder," explained Dr. Kaye. "This study is important because it will help shift focus to the underlying causes of bulimia nervosa so that we can develop better treatments in the future and possibly identify people at risk for the disorder before it occurs."

Bulimia nervosa affects about 1 to 3 percent of women and most commonly occurs in women who are of normal body weight. Onset is usually during adolescence and is characterized by bingeing and purging, either by vomiting or using laxatives. Women with the disease often have a distorted image of their bodies, changes in brain chemistry and psychiatric symptoms such as depression, anxiety, obsessive-compulsive disorder and alcohol or other substance abuse. Though researchers know the symptoms and effects of bulimia, the exact causes of the disorder have yet to be uncovered.

Because malnutrition associated with eating disorders affects brain chemistry, Dr. Kaye and his colleagues compared 31 healthy volunteer women to 30 women who had recovered from bulimia nervosa--they were of normal body weight, had regular menstrual cycles and had not binged or purged for more than a year. The researchers assessed the recovered bulimia nervosa participants for persistent behavior disturbances and measured cerebrospinal fluid levels of the major metabolites of the neurotransmitters serotonin, dopamine and norepinephrine. They also gave the participants a non-therapeutic drug, m-chlorophenylpiperazine (m-CPP), that specifically affects the serotonin system and elicits hormonal and behavioral responses.

Dr. Kaye's team found that, compared to the healthy volunteers, the recovered women had increased levels of the serotonin metabolite and more negative moods and obsessions with perfectionism and exactness. The levels of the other brain chemicals, dopamine and norepinephrine, were normal in comparison. In addition, the group of recovered bulimia nervosa women had more anxiety and disorganized behavioral responses to m-CPP.

"While further research in this area is needed, we are beginning to gain an understanding of some of the causes of bulimia nervosa. Our hope is that this knowledge will contribute to more effective treatments and preventive measures for this disorder," said Dr. Kaye.

Dr. Kaye is principal investigator for a multinational study sponsored by the Price Foundation that may help pinpoint a genetic basis for bulimia nervosa. Research sites at U.S. universities in Pittsburgh, Philadelphia, New York and Los Angeles as well as Canada, Germany and Italy are recruiting 400 women and men with the disorder who also have a biological relative with similar eating concerns or problems. These relative pairs will provide blood samples for genetic analysis and will be interviewed about their disorder. These sites are seeking people with bulimia nervosa who have a relative with an eating disorder to participate in this study. Because these procedures can be performed where a patient lives, no traveling is required.

To learn more about this research, please call toll-free 1-888-895-3886, or e-mail to info@cope.wpic.pitt.edu. All communication is confidential, and participants are paid upon completion of the study.

For additional information about UPMC Health System, please access http://www.upmc.edu.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University Of Pittsburgh Medical Center. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

University Of Pittsburgh Medical Center. "Altered Brain Chemistry In Bulimia Nervosa Patients Persists After Recovery, According To UPMC Researchers." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 15 October 1998. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1998/10/981015080402.htm>.
University Of Pittsburgh Medical Center. (1998, October 15). Altered Brain Chemistry In Bulimia Nervosa Patients Persists After Recovery, According To UPMC Researchers. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 16, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1998/10/981015080402.htm
University Of Pittsburgh Medical Center. "Altered Brain Chemistry In Bulimia Nervosa Patients Persists After Recovery, According To UPMC Researchers." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1998/10/981015080402.htm (accessed September 16, 2014).

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