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Discovery Could Introduce New Age In Electronics

Date:
August 31, 1999
Source:
University Of Toronto
Summary:
A research team from the University of Toronto may have brought the next electronic revolution one step closer to reality.

A research team from the University of Toronto may have brought the next electronic revolution one step closer to reality.

A cross-disciplinary team led by Professors Jimmy Xu of the department of electrical and computer engineering and Martin Moskovits of chemistry has discovered a new method of producing carbon nanotubes. These submicroscopic carbon filaments could prove to be a building block for future generations of computers, sensors and other electronic devices.

Nanotubes, first discovered in 1991, are only a few hundred atoms in circumference and exhibit unique electrical properties: depending on circumstances they may conduct electricity like a wire, act like a semiconductor or conduct no electricity at all. "It's rare that nature hands you a material with these kinds of capabilities," Moskovits says. "A whole new generation of electronics could potentially be based on nanotubes with properties unlike anything currently in use.

The team hopes their low-cost, low-technology method will help provide the material for future researchers to further explore the properties and uses for what could be a major new technology of the 21st century. The researchers published their results in a recent issue of the journal Advanced Physics Letters.

CONTACT:
Bruce Rolston
U of T Public Affairs
(416) 978-6974
bruce.rolston@utoronto.ca


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University Of Toronto. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

University Of Toronto. "Discovery Could Introduce New Age In Electronics." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 31 August 1999. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1999/08/990827152915.htm>.
University Of Toronto. (1999, August 31). Discovery Could Introduce New Age In Electronics. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 24, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1999/08/990827152915.htm
University Of Toronto. "Discovery Could Introduce New Age In Electronics." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1999/08/990827152915.htm (accessed July 24, 2014).

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