Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Halloween Horror Movies May Sabotage Your Social Life

Date:
October 28, 1999
Source:
Virginia Tech
Summary:
When the leaves are swirling around the sidewalks and trick-or-treat costumes are lining aisles of department stores, many people are thinking about taking their dates to a horror movie Halloween night or renting horror movies for parties. Think about it first. It could change your social life or even your working world.

BLACKSBURG, Va. -- When the leaves are swirling around the sidewalks and trick-or-treat costumes are lining aisles of department stores, many people are thinking about taking their dates to a horror movie Halloween night or renting horror movies for parties. Think about it first. It could change your social life or even your working world.

Related Articles


(If you and your date are both breathtakingly good looking, you don't have to worry much about this. You're pretty much immune to negative effects. However, the so-so among us should take note.)

James B. Weaver of Virginia Tech's Laboratory for the Study of Human Thought and Action and fellow researchers from other universities found some tantalizing tidbits of information in their previous studies of the social implication of watching horror movies. For example, if a great-looking guy and a so-so girl go to a horror movie and she cringes and hides her face in his shirt at the messy scenes, she rises a notch or two in his estimation. If, on the other hand, her responses to the gruesome movie are "Oh, get real!" or "That's so juvenile," she falls a couple of more rungs on his appeal ladder. (Of course, if she's a knockout, she can be as brave as she wants -- it makes her even more attractive. Who said the world is fair?)

Of course, if a young woman goes to the horror movie with a guy, she's probably already playing a game. Weaver's studies showed that men enjoy graphic horror much more than women do and are less frightened by it and that women are, as a group, well aware of this fact. So she's probably watching the horror film for his sake, anyway. She just needs to know how to act.

But so does he, if he's the one who's not the knockout. If he's queasy at the bloody parts, she enjoys the movie even less. He becomes less desirable. But if he's seen so many of these gruesome movies that he has mastered his cringe factor, he's seen as stronger and protective. She not only sees him as more attractive, but she deems him to have more of other positive traits than he likely has in reality.

Not only that. No matter if either is appealing or a loser, if the man has been brave at the movie and he and the woman then work together, she'll more likely acquiesce to his statements, even if they are as blatantly erroneous as to say a five-year-old child is 11. "Playing macho while watching horror movies, then, appears to be most beneficial to the appeal, sexual and otherwise, of men not equipped with an irresistible physique," the researchers wrote.

With so much riding on one little viewing of Nightmares or Friday the 13th, maybe you'd better take your date to dinner and dancing instead.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Virginia Tech. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Virginia Tech. "Halloween Horror Movies May Sabotage Your Social Life." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 28 October 1999. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1999/10/991028070523.htm>.
Virginia Tech. (1999, October 28). Halloween Horror Movies May Sabotage Your Social Life. ScienceDaily. Retrieved January 29, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1999/10/991028070523.htm
Virginia Tech. "Halloween Horror Movies May Sabotage Your Social Life." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1999/10/991028070523.htm (accessed January 29, 2015).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Mind & Brain News

Thursday, January 29, 2015

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Signs You Might Be The Passive Aggressive Friend

Signs You Might Be The Passive Aggressive Friend

BuzzFeed (Jan. 28, 2015) "No, I&apos;m not mad. Why, are you mad?" Video provided by BuzzFeed
Powered by NewsLook.com
City Divided: A Look at Model Schools in the TDSB

City Divided: A Look at Model Schools in the TDSB

The Toronto Star (Jan. 27, 2015) Model schools are rethinking how they engage with the community to help enhance the lives of the students and their parents. Video provided by The Toronto Star
Powered by NewsLook.com
Man Saves Pennies For 65 Years

Man Saves Pennies For 65 Years

Rooftop Comedy (Jan. 26, 2015) A man in Texas saved every penny he found for 65 years, and this week he finally cashed them in. Bank tellers at Prosperity Bank in Slaton, Texas were shocked when Ira Keys arrived at their bank with over 500 pounds of loose pennies stored in coffee cans. After more than an hour of sorting and counting, it turned out the 81 year-old was in possession of 81,600 pennies, or $816. And he&apos;s got more at home! Video provided by Rooftop Comedy
Powered by NewsLook.com
How Technology Is Ruining Snow Days For Students

How Technology Is Ruining Snow Days For Students

Newsy (Jan. 25, 2015) More schools are using online classes to keep from losing time to snow days, but it only works if students have Internet access at home. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins