Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Marine And Aerospace Industries Eye New Lightweight Material

Date:
November 17, 1999
Source:
University Of Delaware
Summary:
A building element made of lightweight honeycomb sandwiched between curved composite panels is getting the attention of companies making everything from storage containers to components for the space station.

A building element made of lightweight honeycomb sandwiched between curved composite panels is getting the attention of companies making everything from storage containers to components for the space station, University of Delaware researcher Jack R. Vinson reported Nov. 14.

The marine and avionics industries are especially interested in the new material which, if improved, could contribute significantly to faster boats and fuel-efficient airliners, to meet consumer expectations and regulatory mandates, Vinson and others say.

The advanced material is described as a sandwich structure and features an inner core of composite material designed like a honeycomb, wedged between two outer panels of aluminum or composite material.

Vinson and other researchers involved in testing, analyzing and designing sandwich structures will gather Nov. 14 in Nashville, Tenn., as part of the 1999 International Mechanical Engineering Congress and Exposition, presented by the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME).

The key attribute of a sandwich structure is its light weight, which results from the honeycomb-like design of the inner core, researchers say. Wrapped around the inner core of the sandwich structure are the aluminum or composite panels, or facing sheets. These panels accept most of the moisture, pressure loads and weight-bearing forces exerted from external conditions.

Although the panels of the sandwich structure take most of the pressure, researchers believe it's critical for the core material to withstand some external forces. Engineering approaches to improved designs include reinforcing the core material and creating more separation between the core and outer panels.

The research community also is looking at the problem of breakage in sandwich structures. This occurs when the material that bonds the outer sheets to the core weakens from pressure or moisture. Stronger epoxy agents and improved curing methods can prevent such damage.

According to Vinson, the University's H. Fletcher Brown Professor of Mechanical Engineering, sandwich structures have been used in Europe since the late 1980s, principally in navy ships. In the United States, manufacturers of passenger airliners and military aircraft systems have been the primary users.

Joining Vinson on the conference program are leading researchers from the University of Cincinnati, University of Missouri at Rolla, the Georgia Institute of Technology, Purdue University and the U.S. Department of the Navy. The event will take place at Nashville's Opryland Hotel.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University Of Delaware. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

University Of Delaware. "Marine And Aerospace Industries Eye New Lightweight Material." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 17 November 1999. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1999/11/991117050229.htm>.
University Of Delaware. (1999, November 17). Marine And Aerospace Industries Eye New Lightweight Material. ScienceDaily. Retrieved October 23, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1999/11/991117050229.htm
University Of Delaware. "Marine And Aerospace Industries Eye New Lightweight Material." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1999/11/991117050229.htm (accessed October 23, 2014).

Share This



More Matter & Energy News

Thursday, October 23, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Chameleon Camouflage to Give Tanks Cloaking Capabilities

Chameleon Camouflage to Give Tanks Cloaking Capabilities

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Oct. 22, 2014) — Inspired by the way a chameleon changes its colour to disguise itself; scientists in Poland want to replace traditional camouflage paint with thousands of electrochromic plates that will continuously change colour to blend with its surroundings. The first PL-01 concept tank prototype will be tested within a few years, with scientists predicting that a similar technology could even be woven into the fabric of a soldiers' clothing making them virtually invisible to the naked eye. Matthew Stock reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Jet Sales Lift Boeing Profit 18 Pct.

Jet Sales Lift Boeing Profit 18 Pct.

Reuters - Business Video Online (Oct. 22, 2014) — Strong jet demand has pushed Boeing to raise its profit forecast for the third time, but analysts were disappointed by its small cash flow. Fred Katayama reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Internet of Things Aims to Smarten Your Life

Internet of Things Aims to Smarten Your Life

AP (Oct. 22, 2014) — As more and more Bluetooth-enabled devices are reaching consumers, developers are busy connecting them together as part of the Internet of Things. (Oct. 22) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
What Is Magic Leap, And Why Is It Worth $500M?

What Is Magic Leap, And Why Is It Worth $500M?

Newsy (Oct. 22, 2014) — Magic Leap isn't publicizing much more than a description of its product, but it’s been enough for Google and others to invest more than $500M. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories

 

Space & Time

Matter & Energy

Computers & Math

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins