Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Using Radio Waves To Find Contraband

Date:
October 31, 2001
Source:
Office Of Naval Research
Summary:
Explosives or narcotics concealed in luggage, mailboxes or on a person can’t hide from low frequency radio wave pulses which swiftly and safely detect the presence of the offending substance.

Explosives or narcotics concealed in luggage, mailboxes or on a person can’t hide from low frequency radio wave pulses which swiftly and safely detect the presence of the offending substance.

Based on technology developed by researchers at the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) in Washington, D.C.,with support from the Federal Aviation Administration, the Technical Support Working Group of the Department of Defense, and Office of Naval Research, luggage detection equipment is being tested in airports in the U.S. under an NRL license to Quantum Magnetics, Inc., of San Diego, CA.

The technique used to zero in on explosives and narcotics is a process called nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR). To find the target materials, low frequency radio wave pulses are emitted which momentarily disturbs the alignment of certain nuclei within the material. The pulsing causes the nuclei to realign and send out a unique weak radio signal. A sensor coil, patented by NRL, then hears this signal, which a computer analyzes to determine the presence and type of material found.

NQR is especially effective for land mine detection because today’s plastic-encased land mines have tiny metal firing mechanisms that require extremely sensitive metal detectors that also hone in on shell casings, nails and wire – leading to more false alarms than actual mines. With NQR, the explosives, the very essence of the mine, are being detected.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Office Of Naval Research. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Office Of Naval Research. "Using Radio Waves To Find Contraband." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 31 October 2001. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2001/10/011030230254.htm>.
Office Of Naval Research. (2001, October 31). Using Radio Waves To Find Contraband. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 31, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2001/10/011030230254.htm
Office Of Naval Research. "Using Radio Waves To Find Contraband." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2001/10/011030230254.htm (accessed July 31, 2014).

Share This




More Matter & Energy News

Thursday, July 31, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Britain Testing Driverless Cars on Roadways

Britain Testing Driverless Cars on Roadways

AP (July 30, 2014) British officials said on Wednesday that driverless cars will be tested on roads in as many as three cities in a trial program set to begin in January. Officials said the tests will last up to three years. (July 30) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Amid Drought, UCLA Sees Only Water

Amid Drought, UCLA Sees Only Water

AP (July 30, 2014) A ruptured 93-year-old water main left the UCLA campus awash in 8 million gallons of water in the middle of California's worst drought in decades. (July 30) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Smartphone Powered Paper Plane Debuts at Airshow

Smartphone Powered Paper Plane Debuts at Airshow

AP (July 30, 2014) Smartphone powered paper airplane that was popular on crowdfunding website KickStarter makes its debut at Wisconsin airshow (July 30) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
U.K. To Allow Driverless Cars On Public Roads

U.K. To Allow Driverless Cars On Public Roads

Newsy (July 30, 2014) Driverless cars could soon become a staple on U.K. city streets, as they're set to be introduced to a few cities in 2015. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

    Environment News

    Technology News



      Save/Print:
      Share:

      Free Subscriptions


      Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

      Get Social & Mobile


      Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

      Have Feedback?


      Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
      Mobile: iPhone Android Web
      Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
      Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
      Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins