Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Computer-Controlled Differential Braking Can Prevent Heavy Truck Rollover Accidents

Date:
November 14, 2001
Source:
Penn State
Summary:
Penn State researchers say a computer program they developed and have tested in simulation could automatically adjust the brake forces on the right and left sides of a heavy truck cab and prevent rollover accidents during cornering maneuvers.

Penn State researchers say a computer program they developed and have tested in simulation could automatically adjust the brake forces on the right and left sides of a heavy truck cab and prevent rollover accidents during cornering maneuvers.

A 1988 report from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration showed rollover occurred in 52 percent of the heavy vehicle accidents in which the driver was killed. Another earlier report, concluded that heavy vehicle rollover was responsible for 95 percent of the bulk spillage of hazardous materials.

Dr. Moustafa El-Gindy, director of the Vehicle Simulation Research Center at Penn State’s Transportation Institute (PTI) who led the study, says, "The computer-based controller we’ve developed will adjust the brake forces on the right and left sides of the cab independently to stabilize the vehicle by reducing the spin which causes rollover. We expect to have a prototype to test on a vehicle in about a year."

El-Gindy detailed the approach in a paper, "Nonlinear Active Rollover Prevention Control Strategies for a 5-axle Tractor/Semitrailer," on Monday morning, Nov. 12, at the 2001 ASME International Mechanical Engineering Congress and Exposition in New York City. A. Scott Lewis, research associate at Penn State’s Applied Research Laboratory, is first author of the paper.

"A computer simulation of a 75,000 pound 5-axle tractor/semitrailer was used to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed active control system," Lewis says.

However, he adds that the approach is applicable to any configuration of truck or tractor trailer.

El-Gindy says the biggest problem the team had to overcome was developing a computer program that could adjust to the continuous changes that take place in a tractor-trailer as it maneuvers around a corner. For example, among the changes that can occur during cornering are shifts in the load in the trailer, changes in tire characteristics due to wear or varying inflation pressures, or differences in the truck suspension.

However, the simulation tests have shown that the controller they developed can prevent rollover without significantly changing the direction of the vehicle.

Dr. El-Gindy says that in the application he envisions the controller would engage differential braking automatically only if the lateral acceleration of the vehicle or its spin at its center of gravity exceeded a danger threshold.

"It only takes a few seconds of differential braking to steady the vehicle. If the driver responds and gets the truck under control via other means, the controller will not deploy," he says.

A car manufacturer is currently trying to add a differential-braking concept to passenger cars, says the Penn State researcher. He thinks the new Penn State controller for heavy trucks is the first of its type to offer a workable solution to the rollover problem.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Penn State. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Penn State. "Computer-Controlled Differential Braking Can Prevent Heavy Truck Rollover Accidents." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 14 November 2001. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2001/11/011114071946.htm>.
Penn State. (2001, November 14). Computer-Controlled Differential Braking Can Prevent Heavy Truck Rollover Accidents. ScienceDaily. Retrieved August 21, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2001/11/011114071946.htm
Penn State. "Computer-Controlled Differential Braking Can Prevent Heavy Truck Rollover Accidents." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2001/11/011114071946.htm (accessed August 21, 2014).

Share This




More Matter & Energy News

Thursday, August 21, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Flower Power! Dandelions Make Car Tires?

Flower Power! Dandelions Make Car Tires?

Reuters - Business Video Online (Aug. 20, 2014) Forget rolling on rubber, could car drivers soon be traveling on tires made from dandelions? Teams of scientists are racing to breed a type of the yellow flower whose taproot has a milky fluid with tire-grade rubber particles in it. As Joanna Partridge reports, global tire makers are investing millions in research into a new tire source. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Awesome New Camouflage Sheet Was Inspired By Octopus Skin

Awesome New Camouflage Sheet Was Inspired By Octopus Skin

Newsy (Aug. 19, 2014) Scientists have developed a new device that mimics the way octopuses blend in with their surroundings to hide from dangerous predators. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Researcher Testing on-Field Concussion Scanners

Researcher Testing on-Field Concussion Scanners

AP (Aug. 19, 2014) Four Texas high school football programs are trying out an experimental system designed to diagnose concussions on the field. The technology is in response to growing concern over head trauma in America's most watched sport. (Aug. 19) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Green Power Blooms as Japan Unveils 'hydrangea Solar Cell'

Green Power Blooms as Japan Unveils 'hydrangea Solar Cell'

AFP (Aug. 19, 2014) A solar cell that resembles a flower is offering a new take on green energy in Japan, where one scientist is searching for renewables that look good. Duration: 01:29 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins