Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

UT Southwestern Researcher Investigates Acupuncture For Treatment Of Patients With Bipolar Disorder

Date:
December 18, 2001
Source:
University Of Texas Southwestern Medical Center At Dallas
Summary:
Dr. Tricia Suppes has long been concerned about the 1.9 million Americans with bipolar disorder, also known as manic-depressive illness. That’s why she’s investigating a new use for an old therapy: acupuncture.

DALLAS – Dec. 17, 2001 - Dr. Tricia Suppes has long been concerned about the 1.9 million Americans with bipolar disorder, also known as manic-depressive illness. That’s why she’s investigating a new use for an old therapy: acupuncture. “Bipolar disorder is a common, severe and persistent mental illness that - without effective treatment - disrupts the lives of patients and their families,” said Suppes, associate professor of psychiatry at UT Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas. “If the treatment is inadequate and the patient does not respond well to currently available drugs, the disease may lead to loss of jobs, marriages and even lives. The need for new treatments is critical.”

Related Articles


Suppes is currently enrolling patients 18 to 65 years old who are in the depressed stage of bipolar disorder. In this disorder, patients cycle between depression and elation, extreme irritation or anger.

The study, funded by the National Institute of Mental Health, is the first to evaluate acupuncture as an adjunct to medication for treatment of bipolar illness although an earlier published study at the University of Arizona College of Medicine reported positive results on the use of acupuncture as a treatment for major, or unipolar, depression. Suppes wants to learn whether supplementing bipolar patients’ medications with acupuncture will allow some to reduce their medication.

Current psychotropic medications for bipolar disorder do not work well for many patients. Suppes said some must take a combination of medications daily that can cause significant side effects and can be costly for patients without insurance. That often causes patients to discontinue their medication, she said.

The study will involve 30 male and female patients randomly divided into two groups. Some will receive acupuncture directed toward treating depressive symptoms. Others will receive nonspecific acupuncture, which treats certain physical complaints. Patients, who will continue on their regular medications during the trial, will not know which type of acupuncture they are receiving. All will be treated free for eight weeks. The patients receiving nonspecific acupuncture will be offered acupuncture specifically intended for depression at the conclusion of the trial.

For further information about the study, call the Bipolar Disorder Clinic and Research Program at 214-648-7474.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University Of Texas Southwestern Medical Center At Dallas. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

University Of Texas Southwestern Medical Center At Dallas. "UT Southwestern Researcher Investigates Acupuncture For Treatment Of Patients With Bipolar Disorder." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 18 December 2001. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2001/12/011218072946.htm>.
University Of Texas Southwestern Medical Center At Dallas. (2001, December 18). UT Southwestern Researcher Investigates Acupuncture For Treatment Of Patients With Bipolar Disorder. ScienceDaily. Retrieved January 27, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2001/12/011218072946.htm
University Of Texas Southwestern Medical Center At Dallas. "UT Southwestern Researcher Investigates Acupuncture For Treatment Of Patients With Bipolar Disorder." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2001/12/011218072946.htm (accessed January 27, 2015).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Mind & Brain News

Tuesday, January 27, 2015

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

How Technology Is Ruining Snow Days For Students

How Technology Is Ruining Snow Days For Students

Newsy (Jan. 25, 2015) More schools are using online classes to keep from losing time to snow days, but it only works if students have Internet access at home. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Weird Things Couples Do When They Lose Their Phone

Weird Things Couples Do When They Lose Their Phone

BuzzFeed (Jan. 24, 2015) Did you back it up? Do you even know how to do that? Video provided by BuzzFeed
Powered by NewsLook.com
Smart Wristband to Shock Away Bad Habits

Smart Wristband to Shock Away Bad Habits

Reuters - Innovations Video Online (Jan. 23, 2015) A Boston start-up is developing a wristband they say will help users break bad habits by jolting them with an electric shock. Ben Gruber reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Amazing Technology Allows Blind Mother to See Her Newborn Son

Amazing Technology Allows Blind Mother to See Her Newborn Son

RightThisMinute (Jan. 23, 2015) Not only is Kathy seeing her newborn son for the first time, but this is actually the first time she has ever seen a baby. Kathy and her sister, Yvonne, have been legally blind since childhood, but thanks to an amazing new technology, eSight glasses, which gives those who are legally blind the ability to see, she got the chance to see the birth of her son. It&apos;s an incredible moment and an even better story. Video provided by RightThisMinute
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories


Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins