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New Insight Into Sudden Infant Death Syndrome

Date:
December 21, 2001
Source:
Uppsala University
Summary:
Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) usually affects infants during their first six months of life. The incidence of this disease in Sweden increased during the 1980’s and was approximately one death in 1000 live births in 1990 and was considerably greater in some other countries. After 1992-1993 the incidence of this disease has decreased to a level of approximately one third of that in 1990.

Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) usually affects infants during their first six months of life. The incidence of this disease in Sweden increased during the 1980’s and was approximately one death in 1000 live births in 1990 and was considerably greater in some other countries. After 1992-1993 the incidence of this disease has decreased to a level of approximately one third of that in 1990. This decrease has been considered not only to be associated with the recommendation to parents not to place the babies in the prone position during sleep but also with an intense propaganda to breast feed the infants, and to abstain from smoking during pregnancy and the infant’s first six months of life. In addition to this a too warm sleep environment and excess bedclothing are known risk factors. However, the true mechanisms behind SIDS remain unknown. In 1997 professor Lars Wiklund and his co-workers published results that demonstrated that victims of SIDS, in contrast to those who died from other causes, had an enteric microflora that was not capable of metabolising urea to ammonium ion, urea being a natural component of both human breast milk and cow’s milk. The hypothesis was that this resulted in alkalinisation of the baby that was forced to compensate by lowering of the carbon dioxide elimination by reducing the pulmonary ventilation. This could lead to unconsciousness and worsen breathing. Unless this sequence of events was stopped it could result in death. The hypothesis is in agreement with previously recognised risk factors. The prone position e.g. results in a higher body temperature which leads to a higher carbon dioxide tension and subsequently sometimes to unconsciousness and an increased risk of death. In the same study it was also shown that the urea metabolising enteric bacteria produce nitric oxide in small amounts, the concentration of which was correlated to the remaining unmetabolised urea content in faeces. It was also shown that very small amounts of nitrate and nitrite inhibit the urea metabolism of the enteric microflora.


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The above story is based on materials provided by Uppsala University. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Uppsala University. "New Insight Into Sudden Infant Death Syndrome." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 21 December 2001. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2001/12/011221081106.htm>.
Uppsala University. (2001, December 21). New Insight Into Sudden Infant Death Syndrome. ScienceDaily. Retrieved April 18, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2001/12/011221081106.htm
Uppsala University. "New Insight Into Sudden Infant Death Syndrome." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2001/12/011221081106.htm (accessed April 18, 2014).

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