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Cirrhosis

Cirrhosis is a consequence of chronic liver disease characterized by replacement of liver tissue by fibrotic scar tissue as well as regenerative nodules, leading to progressive loss of liver function.

Cirrhosis is most commonly caused by alcoholism and hepatitis C, and was the 12th leading cause of death in the United States in 2000.

Ascites is the most common complication of cirrhosis and is associated with a poor quality of life, increased risk of infections, and a poor long term outcome.

In advanced stages of cirrhosis, the condition is irreversible and the only option would be a liver transplant.

Note:   The above text is excerpted from the Wikipedia article "Cirrhosis", which has been released under the GNU Free Documentation License.
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May 27, 2015

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updated 12:56 pm ET