Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

New Technology Detects Lying, Paves Way For Increased Security

Date:
January 4, 2002
Source:
Mayo Clinic
Summary:
A Mayo Clinic-led study that appears in the Jan. 3, 2002 edition of Nature found that a new high-definition technology that involves measurement of the heat patterns created by the face accurately detected lying in more than 80 percent of cases studied. The new high definition technology involves the measurement of the heat patterns created by the face; these heat patterns change dramatically with lying.

ROCHESTER, MINN. -- A Mayo Clinic-led study that appears in the Jan. 3, 2002 edition of Nature found that a new high-definition technology that involves measurement of the heat patterns created by the face accurately detected lying in more than 80 percent of cases studied. The new high definition technology involves the measurement of the heat patterns created by the face; these heat patterns change dramatically with lying.

A research team lead by James Levine, M.D., a Mayo Clinic endocrinologist, and supported by Ioannis Pavlidis, Ph.D., Honeywell Laboratories, based their work on the concept that people about to perform such deceptive acts give off physiological signals, such as excessive blood flow to certain areas of the face. When these signals are detected, via high definition thermal imaging equipment, they can significantly assist authorities in detecting deception.

The advanced thermal imaging technology was developed as part of a collaborative effort between Mayo Clinic and Honeywell Laboratories, the global research and development organization for Honeywell International.

"The technology represents a new and potentially accurate method of lie detection," says Dr. Levine. "The development holds promise for practical application in high-level security operations, such as airport security and border checkpoints.

"The thermal imaging technology detects the subtle changes in metabolism in parts of the body. When an individual is exposed to the thermal imaging camera and is being deceptive, the computer detects the warming around the eyes," Dr. Levine says.

Clinical trials of the technology were conducted using a mock crime scenario. The thermal imaging system correctly categorized 83 percent of these subjects as guilty or innocent.

Once refined for practical high-volume use, this technology would enable lying to be rapidly detected and analyzed without physical contact, in the absence of trained staff and in a variety of physical settings.

"If the technology proves this accurate in the airport, it could revolutionize airport screening. However, further testing and development are needed," says Dr. Levine.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Mayo Clinic. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Mayo Clinic. "New Technology Detects Lying, Paves Way For Increased Security." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 4 January 2002. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2002/01/020103083716.htm>.
Mayo Clinic. (2002, January 4). New Technology Detects Lying, Paves Way For Increased Security. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 22, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2002/01/020103083716.htm
Mayo Clinic. "New Technology Detects Lying, Paves Way For Increased Security." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2002/01/020103083716.htm (accessed September 22, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Monday, September 22, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Sierra Leone in Lockdown to Control Ebola

Sierra Leone in Lockdown to Control Ebola

AP (Sep. 21, 2014) Sierra Leone residents remained in lockdown on Saturday as part of a massive effort to confine millions of people to their homes in a bid to stem the biggest Ebola outbreak in history. (Sept. 20) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
Sierra Leone's Nationwide Ebola Curfew Underway

Sierra Leone's Nationwide Ebola Curfew Underway

Newsy (Sep. 20, 2014) Sierra Leone is locked down as aid workers and volunteers look for new cases of Ebola. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Changes Found In Brain After One Dose Of Antidepressants

Changes Found In Brain After One Dose Of Antidepressants

Newsy (Sep. 19, 2014) A study suggest antidepressants can kick in much sooner than previously thought. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Could Grief Affect The Immune Systems Of Senior Citizens?

Could Grief Affect The Immune Systems Of Senior Citizens?

Newsy (Sep. 19, 2014) The study found elderly people are much more likely to become susceptible to infection than younger adults going though a similar situation. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins