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World’s Smallest Microchain Drive Fabricated At Sandia

Date:
January 17, 2002
Source:
Sandia National Laboratories
Summary:
A microchain that closely resembles a bicycle chain — except that each link could rest comfortably atop a human hair — has been fabricated at the Department of Energy’s Sandia National Laboratories.

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M — A microchain that closely resembles a bicycle chain — except that each link could rest comfortably atop a human hair — has been fabricated at the Department of Energy’s Sandia National Laboratories.

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(The distance between chain link centers is 50 microns. The diameter of a human hair is approximately 70 microns.)

Because a single microchain could rotate many drive shafts, the device would make it unnecessary to place multiple tiny microelectromechanical (MEMS) motors in close proximity. Usually, a separate driver powers each MEMS device.

“All those drives take up a lot of real estate on chips,” says Sandia technician Ed Vernon, who has received a patent for the silicon microchain.

The microchain also makes it possible to drive a MEMS device from a motor situated at a distance, again saving considerable space on the MEMS-bearing chip.

The microchain, says Ed, could be used to power microcamera shutters, as larger chains currently do in the macroworld. It could also be used in mechanical timing and decoding.

The 50-link silicon microchain is designed to transmit power somewhat like the drive belt in a 19th-century sewing factory. There, a central engine shaft powered by steam turned drive belts to power distant work stations — for example, sewing machines — before the dawn of the age of electricity.

Chain systems, unlike stroke systems, do not require back-and-forth movements but instead allow for both continuous and intermittent drive translation.

Vernon fabricated a microchain rather than a microbelt because although silicon belts are tough and flexible, they are spring-like and produce too much torque on gears not aligned in a straight line. Each chain link, on the other hand, is capable of plus-or-minus 52 degrees rotation with respect to the preceding link, without creating pressure on the support structure. The wide angle means MEMS designers can be relatively unconstrained in positioning multiple devices.

The longest span unsupported by gears or bracing is 500 microns. A microchain tensioner is needed to accommodate longer spans.

The multilevel surface-micromachined silicon device was constructed with the aid of Sandia’s patented Summit IV and Summit V technology, which enables construction of complicated MEMS devices.

Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin company, for the U.S. Department of Energy. With main facilities in Albuquerque, N.M., and Livermore, Calif., Sandia has major R&D responsibilities in national security, energy and environmental technologies, and economic competitiveness.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Sandia National Laboratories. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Sandia National Laboratories. "World’s Smallest Microchain Drive Fabricated At Sandia." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 17 January 2002. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2002/01/020116072042.htm>.
Sandia National Laboratories. (2002, January 17). World’s Smallest Microchain Drive Fabricated At Sandia. ScienceDaily. Retrieved November 24, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2002/01/020116072042.htm
Sandia National Laboratories. "World’s Smallest Microchain Drive Fabricated At Sandia." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2002/01/020116072042.htm (accessed November 24, 2014).

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