Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Technique Aims To Protect, Possibly Improve Internet Video

Date:
January 17, 2002
Source:
Purdue University
Summary:
Researchers at Purdue University are close to perfecting a technique that will make it practical to use "digital watermarking" for video sent over the Internet, providing a reliable way to protect copyrights and to verify a video's authenticity.

WEST LAFAYETTE, Ind. — Researchers at Purdue University are close to perfecting a technique that will make it practical to use "digital watermarking" for video sent over the Internet, providing a reliable way to protect copyrights and to verify a video's authenticity.

Digital watermarking, or steganography, is a procedure in which hidden patterns are embedded into an image or document on the World Wide Web. The patterns can then be used to verify the image as authentic, protecting intellectual property rights for people who create digital media.

However, watermarking is especially difficult to use for Internet video. As video is transmitted over the "noisy," traffic-congested Internet, a number of frames never make it to the receiving end. The frames, including those that may contain digital watermarks, are lost, said Edward Delp, a professor of electrical and computer engineering at Purdue.

The Purdue research concerns a technique that "resynchronizes" video at the receiving end of the transmission, preventing the frames from being lost.

New findings will be detailed in a paper to be presented Jan. 23 during an international conference called Security and Watermarking of Multimedia Contents IV, in San Jose, Calif. The paper was written by Delp, Purdue doctoral student Eugene T. Lin and Christine Podilchuk, a research engineer at Lucent Technologies/Bell Laboratories.

The technique aims to benefit anyone who wants to stream video content over the Internet, from broadcasters to law enforcement officials.

"Perhaps a surveillance camera is looking at a scene," Delp said. "Instead of sending it through some sort of broadcast medium, it could be sent over the Internet."

The resynchronization technique also might have applications in deciphering hidden watermark messages incorporated into Internet video for illicit purposes, including communications among terrorists. Digital media can be screened for hidden terrorist messages by using "steganalysis," which will be the subject of a special session during the conference, Delp said.

Because digital video will become more common over the next five years, techniques will be needed soon to maintain the quality of video as it is transmitted over the Web.

"The network is overloaded, and you get dropouts, or missing data," Delp said. "You can get enough errors to make the video almost unwatchable."

Standard "error correction" techniques used to recover lost data in e-mail transmissions do not work for video and audio transmissions.

The researchers have created a computer algorithm — a series of steps that enable a computer to complete a task — that promises to solve the problem.

"We have developed a mechanism under which, at the receiving end, you will be able to correct the errors that occurred in the Internet transmission and be able to recover the hidden messages in video," Delp said.

Video relies on critical split-second timing for individual frames that follow one another. The precise, rapid firing of 30 frames per second creates the illusion of continuous movement.

As video is transmitted over the Internet, however, it is difficult to maintain this delicate timing.

The new technique resynchronizes the transmission at the receiving end, fixing errors that throw off the timing and result in lost information.

The very nature of video makes watermarking difficult.

"You are presented with 30 frames per second, and your eye integrates those to make it look like continuous motion," Delp said. "But your eye is real susceptible to any subtle changes in the images from one frame to the next.

"If you don't properly put the watermark into the video, you can see the watermarked image, which is not supposed to be visible."

To properly embed watermarks into video, the Purdue researchers use a computer program that mimics how people see video.

"We exploit a human visual system model that tells us what you can see and what you can't see when its moving," Delp said.

The technique might be used to improve the quality of Internet video. "But the research is not focused in this direction yet," he said.

The Purdue researchers have been working on digital watermarking for more than five years, and they began working on developing techniques for video about two years ago.

"We are showing that our technique is probably better than any of the other current techniques for watermarking resynchronization," Delp said. "But to solve the entire problem to my satisfaction is going to take almost two more years."

Delp is co-chair of the conference, which attracts researchers from about 40 nations, and he is chair of the "video techniques" session that includes his paper. The conference is sponsored by the International Society for Optical Engineering and the Society for Imaging Science and Technology.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Purdue University. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Purdue University. "Technique Aims To Protect, Possibly Improve Internet Video." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 17 January 2002. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2002/01/020117072613.htm>.
Purdue University. (2002, January 17). Technique Aims To Protect, Possibly Improve Internet Video. ScienceDaily. Retrieved July 29, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2002/01/020117072613.htm
Purdue University. "Technique Aims To Protect, Possibly Improve Internet Video." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2002/01/020117072613.htm (accessed July 29, 2014).

Share This




More Computers & Math News

Tuesday, July 29, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Teen's Phone Ignites Under Her Pillow; How Real Is The Risk?

Teen's Phone Ignites Under Her Pillow; How Real Is The Risk?

Newsy (July 28, 2014) A Texas teen's Samsung phone apparently ignited while she slept, but what was the real problem here? Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Google's Next Frontier: The Human Body

Google's Next Frontier: The Human Body

Newsy (July 27, 2014) Google is collecting genetic and molecular information to paint a picture of the perfectly healthy human. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Cellphone Unlocking Bill Clears U.S. House, Heads to Obama

Cellphone Unlocking Bill Clears U.S. House, Heads to Obama

Reuters - US Online Video (July 27, 2014) Congress gets rid of pesky law that made it illegal to "unlock" mobile phones without permission, giving consumers the option to use the same phone on a competitor's wireless network. Mana Rabiee reports. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Congress OKs Unlocking Phones From Carriers

Congress OKs Unlocking Phones From Carriers

Newsy (July 26, 2014) A bill legalizing "unlocking," or untethering a phone from its default wireless carrier, has passed Congress and is expected to be signed into law. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins