Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Rutgers Research On Shear Activity May Improve Safety In Areas As Diverse As Landslides, Pill Manufacture

Date:
January 18, 2002
Source:
Rutgers, The State University Of New Jersey
Summary:
Wind shear, the force feared by airline pilots, has an important earthbound counterpart, write Rutgers engineers in a paper published Jan. 17 in the prestigious science journal "Nature." Benjamin J. Glasser and Troy Shinbrot found that when multiple streams of granular material flow together – whether the materials are debris in a landslide or powders used in manufacturing – the multiple streams can suddenly take on a wavy flow that mimics action seen in liquids or gases.

NEW BRUNSWICK/PISCATAWAY, N.J. – Wind shear, the force feared by airline pilots, has an important earthbound counterpart, write Rutgers engineers in a paper published Jan. 17 in the prestigious science journal "Nature." Benjamin J. Glasser and Troy Shinbrot found that when multiple streams of granular material flow together – whether the materials are debris in a landslide or powders used in manufacturing – the multiple streams can suddenly take on a wavy flow that mimics action seen in liquids or gases.

Shinbrot is an associate research professor and Glasser is an assistant professor and associate director of the pharmaceutical engineering program in Rutgers department of chemical and biochemical engineering. They worked with David J. Goldfarb, now at the Schering-Plough Research Institute, on the paper entitled "Shear instabilities in granular flows."

The discovery has a wide range of implications in areas ranging from pharmaceutical manufacturing to predicting how landslides will behave, the scientists said.

"At some point, almost all pharmaceutical tablet production relies on granular materials or powders flowing down chutes," said Shinbrot, who studied computer videos of materials streams working themselves into virtual whitecaps. "Understanding how and why the materials interact as they flow can lead to more consistent pharmaceutical products."

The average pharmaceutical tablet weighs only a quarter of a gram, and Glasser noted that each may include only a few milligrams of active ingredient. "Variation in the mixture because of shear forces during manufacture can lead to a pill not doing what it's supposed to do," he said. "It can be dangerous." The use of flowing granular material is also common in other industries such as food manufacturing and mining.

Formulas developed over the years for understanding how flowing liquids and gases create shear activity have led to more accurate weather forecasting, safer air travel and more-efficient ships. He said the discovery of shear instability in granular flows could potentially lead to development of equations and formulas for flow of granular materials.

Shinbrot and Glasser said one of the more dramatic applications of granular flow research may be in understanding landslides. "In time we may be able to predict where and how landslide debris will flow. This could help us do a better job of warning people and placing barriers where they'll do the most good," Glasser said.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Rutgers, The State University Of New Jersey. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Rutgers, The State University Of New Jersey. "Rutgers Research On Shear Activity May Improve Safety In Areas As Diverse As Landslides, Pill Manufacture." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 18 January 2002. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2002/01/020118075034.htm>.
Rutgers, The State University Of New Jersey. (2002, January 18). Rutgers Research On Shear Activity May Improve Safety In Areas As Diverse As Landslides, Pill Manufacture. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 2, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2002/01/020118075034.htm
Rutgers, The State University Of New Jersey. "Rutgers Research On Shear Activity May Improve Safety In Areas As Diverse As Landslides, Pill Manufacture." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2002/01/020118075034.htm (accessed September 2, 2014).

Share This




More Matter & Energy News

Tuesday, September 2, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Australian Airlines Relax Phone Ban Too

Australian Airlines Relax Phone Ban Too

Reuters - Business Video Online (Aug. 26, 2014) Qantas and Virgin say passengers can use their smartphones and tablets throughout flights after a regulator relaxed a ban on electronic devices during take-off and landing. As Hayley Platt reports the move comes as the two domestic rivals are expected to post annual net losses later this week. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Hurricane Marie Brings Big Waves to California Coast

Hurricane Marie Brings Big Waves to California Coast

Reuters - US Online Video (Aug. 26, 2014) Huge waves generated by Hurricane Marie hit the Southern California coast. Rough Cut (no reporter narration). Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com
Chinese Researchers Might Be Creating Supersonic Submarine

Chinese Researchers Might Be Creating Supersonic Submarine

Newsy (Aug. 26, 2014) Chinese researchers have expanded on Cold War-era tech and are closer to building a submarine that could reach the speed of sound. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Breakingviews: India Coal Strained by Supreme Court Ruling

Breakingviews: India Coal Strained by Supreme Court Ruling

Reuters - Business Video Online (Aug. 26, 2014) An acute coal shortage is likely to be aggravated as India's supreme court declared government coal allocations illegal, says Breakingviews' Peter Thal Larsen. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins