Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

University Of Pittsburgh Researchers Use Botox To Treat Overactive Bladder

Date:
May 27, 2002
Source:
University Of Pittsburgh Medical Center
Summary:
Botulinum toxin A (BTX) injections, commonly known as botox, show promise as a treatment for a variety of lower urinary tract dysfunctions, according to a study presented by University of Pittsburgh researchers at the American Urological Association Centennial Celebration Annual Meeting. Results will be published in abstract 98 in the AUA proceedings.

ORLANDO, May 25 – Botulinum toxin A (BTX) injections, commonly known as botox, show promise as a treatment for a variety of lower urinary tract dysfunctions, according to a study presented by University of Pittsburgh researchers at the American Urological Association Centennial Celebration Annual Meeting. Results will be published in abstract 98 in the AUA proceedings.

Related Articles


“Bladder dysfunction affects a staggering number of people worldwide. The use of botox injections can offer many of these patients a safe, but temporary, solution to this embarrassing problem,” said Michael Chancellor, M.D., professor of urology and gynecology at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine.

In the study, 50 patients were injected with BTX into the bladder or urethra. Patients suffered from a variety of voiding dysfunctions, including multiple sclerosis, spinal cord injury, stroke, overactive bladder, and interstitial cystitis (IC). Each experienced involuntary contractions of the bladder muscle, which either caused incontinence typified by either uncontrolled voiding of urine or the inability to completely empty the bladder.

Forty-one of the 50 patients, or 82 percent, reported a decrease or absence of incontinence after the injections. The decrease was seen within seven days of the injection and symptoms were alleviated for approximately six months. None of the patients experienced long-term complications from the treatment such as stress incontinence or urinary retention.

BTX acts by binding to the nerve endings of muscles, blocking the release of the chemical that causes the muscle to contract. When injected into specific muscles, the muscle becomes paralyzed or weakened, but leaves surrounding muscles unaffected, allowing for normal muscle function.

Common urologic conditions like neurogenic detrusor hyperreflexia and overactive bladder are caused by involuntary contractions of the detrusor muscle, which controls the bladder. This new therapy helps alleviate the contractions, restoring normal bladder function.

Over 17 million Americans suffer from overactive bladder, a condition that significantly affects the patient’s quality of life. An estimated 80 percent of these patients do not seek help or treatment for this condition. Overactive bladder is characterized by the following conditions: frequency, urinating more than eight times in a 24 hour period; urgency, the immediate and strong urge to urinate; and urge incontinence, the inability to suppress urgency resulting in the leaking or loss of urine.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by University Of Pittsburgh Medical Center. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

University Of Pittsburgh Medical Center. "University Of Pittsburgh Researchers Use Botox To Treat Overactive Bladder." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 27 May 2002. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2002/05/020527081316.htm>.
University Of Pittsburgh Medical Center. (2002, May 27). University Of Pittsburgh Researchers Use Botox To Treat Overactive Bladder. ScienceDaily. Retrieved March 29, 2015 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2002/05/020527081316.htm
University Of Pittsburgh Medical Center. "University Of Pittsburgh Researchers Use Botox To Treat Overactive Bladder." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2002/05/020527081316.htm (accessed March 29, 2015).

Share This


More From ScienceDaily



More Health & Medicine News

Sunday, March 29, 2015

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

S. Leone in New Anti-Ebola Lockdown

S. Leone in New Anti-Ebola Lockdown

AFP (Mar. 28, 2015) — Sierra Leone imposed a three-day nationwide lockdown Friday for the second time in six months in a bid to prevent a resurgence of the deadly Ebola virus. Duration: 01:17 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
These Popular Antibiotics Can Cause Permanent Nerve Damage

These Popular Antibiotics Can Cause Permanent Nerve Damage

Newsy (Mar. 27, 2015) — A popular class of antibiotic can leave patients in severe pain and even result in permanent nerve damage. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
WH Plan to Fight Antibiotic-Resistant Germs

WH Plan to Fight Antibiotic-Resistant Germs

AP (Mar. 27, 2015) — The White House on Friday announced a five-year plan to fight the threat posed by antibiotic-resistant bacteria amid fears that once-treatable germs could become deadly. (March 27) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
House Ready to Pass Medicare Doc Bill

House Ready to Pass Medicare Doc Bill

AP (Mar. 26, 2015) — In rare bipartisan harmony, congressional leaders pushed a $214 billion bill permanently blocking physician Medicare cuts toward House passage Thursday, moving lawmakers closer to resolving a problem that has plagued them for years. (March 26) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
 
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:  

Breaking News:

Strange & Offbeat Stories

 

Health & Medicine

Mind & Brain

Living & Well

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:  

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile iPhone Android Web
Follow Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins