Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

New Natural Method Of Family Planning Over 95% Effective In Preventing Pregnancy, Study Finds

Date:
June 11, 2002
Source:
Georgetown University Medical Center
Summary:
The Standard Days Method (TM), a new natural method of family planning, is more than 95% effective at preventing pregnancy, according to an international study conducted by Georgetown University Medical Center's Institute for Reproductive Health. Results of the study are published in the current issue of Contraception, the journal of the Association of Reproductive Health Professionals.

The Standard Days Method (TM), a new natural method of family planning, is more than 95% effective at preventing pregnancy, according to an international study conducted by Georgetown University Medical Center's Institute for Reproductive Health. Results of the study are published in the current issue of Contraception, the journal of the Association of Reproductive Health Professionals.

Based on sophisticated computer modeling of reproductive physiology data, the Standard Days Method identifies the 12-day "fertile window" of a woman's menstrual cycle. These 12 days take into account the life span of the woman's egg (about 24 hours) and the viable life of sperm (about 5 days) as well as the variation in the actual timing of ovulation from one cycle to the next. The study found the efficacy of the Standard Days Method to be comparable to or better than a number of other widely used methods of family planning, including the diaphragm and condom.

The two-year clinical trial evaluated the effectiveness of the Standard Days Method of family planning for 478 women in Bolivia, Peru and the Philippines. The women were of childbearing age with menstrual cycles between 26 and 32 days long. The study followed the women over 13 cycles.

"Millions of women worldwide use no form of family planning whatsoever, even though they do not want to become pregnant. And millions more rely on periodic abstinence as their primary form of family planning, but do not have a clear understanding of which days in their cycle they should avoid unprotected intercourse," said Victoria Jennings, PhD, Georgetown professor of obstetrics and gynecology and principal investigator of the study. "Clearly there is a need for a simpler, easier method of natural family planning--and that is where the Standard Days Method can really fill a void."

To help women keep track of which days to avoid unprotected intercourse, the Institute for Reproductive Health developed CycleBeads (TM), a string of 32 color-coded beads with each bead representing a day of the menstrual cycle. Beginning with the red bead, which represents the first day of her menstrual period, the woman moves a small rubber ring one bead each day. The brown beads are the days when pregnancy is very unlikely, and the glow-in-the dark white beads (beads 8-19) represent her fertile days. The 478 women who participated in the clinical trial relied on CycleBeads to track their cycles.

The method works best for women whose cycles are usually between 26 and 32 days long. Women use the CycleBeads and the Standard Days Method the same way every month.

"In our research, CycleBeads were found to be an easy way for women to use the Standard Days Method. They are an effective tool for women who want to use a reliable, inexpensive, non-invasive, non-hormonal method of family planning," said Dr. Jennings.

The Standards Days Method differs from the rhythm method in that the rhythm method requires that the woman collect detailed information about the last six menstrual cycles and perform monthly calculations to figure out which days in the current cycle she is most likely to get pregnant. The Standard Days Method requires no such calculations. No reliable, scientific effectiveness trial of the rhythm method has been reported.

According to the 1998 edition of Contraceptive Technology, 85% of women who use no method of family planning will get pregnant in one year. The percent of women who will become pregnant during the first year of perfect use of a "user-controlled" method is as follows:

  • Cervical cap, 9 - 26%
  • Spermicides, 6%
  • Diaphragm, 6%
  • Female condom, 5%
  • Male condom, 3%
  • Birth control pills, 0.1 - 0.5%
  • Standard Days Method, 5% (2002 Georgetown study)

Several thousand women in 14 countries currently use the Standard Days Method and CycleBeads. Plans to manufacture and distribute CycleBeads in numerous countries, including the United States, are currently underway. More information about the Standard Days Method and CycleBeads can be found at http://www.irh.org.

Co-authors of the new Standard Days Method study published in Contraception are Marcos Arevalo, MD, MPH and Irit Sinai, PhD, both assistant professors of obstetrics and gynecology at Georgetown University Medical Center. The study was funded by the U.S. Agency for International Development.

Georgetown University Medical Center includes the School of Medicine, School of Nursing and Health Studies, the Lombardi Cancer Center and a $120 million biomedical research enterprise. The Institute for Reproductive Health (http://www.irh.org) conducts research, advances scientific information, and provides policy support in natural family planning and fertility awareness.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Georgetown University Medical Center. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Georgetown University Medical Center. "New Natural Method Of Family Planning Over 95% Effective In Preventing Pregnancy, Study Finds." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 11 June 2002. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2002/06/020611071058.htm>.
Georgetown University Medical Center. (2002, June 11). New Natural Method Of Family Planning Over 95% Effective In Preventing Pregnancy, Study Finds. ScienceDaily. Retrieved August 20, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2002/06/020611071058.htm
Georgetown University Medical Center. "New Natural Method Of Family Planning Over 95% Effective In Preventing Pregnancy, Study Finds." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2002/06/020611071058.htm (accessed August 20, 2014).

Share This




More Health & Medicine News

Wednesday, August 20, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Ebola-Hit Sierra Leone's Freetown a City on Edge

Ebola-Hit Sierra Leone's Freetown a City on Edge

AFP (Aug. 19, 2014) Residents of Sierra Leone's capital voice their fears as the Ebola virus sweeps through west Africa. Duration: 00:56 Video provided by AFP
Powered by NewsLook.com
101-Year-Old Working Man Has All The Advice You Need

101-Year-Old Working Man Has All The Advice You Need

Newsy (Aug. 19, 2014) Herman Goldman has worked at the same lighting store for almost 75 years. Find out his secrets to a happy, productive life. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Researcher Testing on-Field Concussion Scanners

Researcher Testing on-Field Concussion Scanners

AP (Aug. 19, 2014) Four Texas high school football programs are trying out an experimental system designed to diagnose concussions on the field. The technology is in response to growing concern over head trauma in America's most watched sport. (Aug. 19) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
American Ebola Patient Apparently Improving, Outbreak Is Not

American Ebola Patient Apparently Improving, Outbreak Is Not

Newsy (Aug. 19, 2014) Nancy Writebol, an American missionary who contracted Ebola, is apparently getting better, according to her husband. The outbreak, however, is not. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins