Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations

Mayo Clinic Researchers Develop A New Imaging Test For Diagnosing Breast Cancer

Date:
June 26, 2002
Source:
Mayo Clinic
Summary:
Mayo Clinic researchers have found that breast tumors can be detected with a new imaging technique called magnetic resonance (MR) elastography. This test uses a combination of sound waves and MRI to evaluate the mechanical properties of tissues within the breast. In the future, this could mean earlier and more reliable diagnosis of breast cancer. The study was published in the June 2002 issue of the American Journal of Roentgenology.

ROCHESTER, MINN. -- Mayo Clinic researchers have found that breast tumors can be detected with a new imaging technique called magnetic resonance (MR) elastography. This test uses a combination of sound waves and MRI to evaluate the mechanical properties of tissues within the breast. In the future, this could mean earlier and more reliable diagnosis of breast cancer. The study was published in the June 2002 issue of the American Journal of Roentgenology.

In the study, investigators modified an MRI scanner to beam sound waves into the breast during MR imaging. A scanning technique developed by the Mayo researchers provides data which is then processed to yield images displaying the mechanical properties of breast tissues.

"Malignant breast tumors tend to be much harder than normal tissues and most benign tumors," says Richard Ehman, M.D., a Mayo Clinic diagnostic radiologist and principal investigator of the study. "This explains why breast cancer is often detected by physical examination simply on the basis of a very hard lump in the breast."

The MR elastography technique was tested on six healthy women and six women with known breast cancer. The images of women with breast cancer demonstrated areas of very high tissue stiffness corresponding to the known tumors. On average, the stiffness of the breast cancer tissue was more than four times higher than the surrounding tissue.

"Conventional MRI is very sensitive for detecting breast cancer, but unfortunately there are too many false positives," Dr. Ehman says. "The goal of our research is to determine whether we can use this new MR elastography technique to improve the accuracy of MRI for breast cancer diagnosis, thereby reducing the need for biopsies."

"Standard imaging techniques such as computed tomography, ultrasonography and MRI do not provide information about the mechanical properties of tissue," says Jennifer Kugel, Mayo Clinic research technologist and one of the authors of the study. "This new imaging technology is exciting because it allows us to look at tissues in a way that has never before been possible."

Breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed life-threatening cancer in North American women. Mortality from this disease is stage-dependent, making early detection the key to survival. These considerations, along with the limitations of mammography, motivated Mayo Clinic researchers to develop this study.

"Mammography does not work as well for women with dense breasts, those who have had lumpectomies or premenopausal women," Kugel says. "In these cases, a combination of MRI and MR elastography could be used as an additional screening tool."

This research is supported by a grant from the National Cancer Institute.


Story Source:

The above story is based on materials provided by Mayo Clinic. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.


Cite This Page:

Mayo Clinic. "Mayo Clinic Researchers Develop A New Imaging Test For Diagnosing Breast Cancer." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 26 June 2002. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2002/06/020626071110.htm>.
Mayo Clinic. (2002, June 26). Mayo Clinic Researchers Develop A New Imaging Test For Diagnosing Breast Cancer. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 19, 2014 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2002/06/020626071110.htm
Mayo Clinic. "Mayo Clinic Researchers Develop A New Imaging Test For Diagnosing Breast Cancer." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2002/06/020626071110.htm (accessed September 19, 2014).

Share This



More Health & Medicine News

Friday, September 19, 2014

Featured Research

from universities, journals, and other organizations


Featured Videos

from AP, Reuters, AFP, and other news services

Could Grief Affect The Immune Systems Of Senior Citizens?

Could Grief Affect The Immune Systems Of Senior Citizens?

Newsy (Sep. 19, 2014) The study found elderly people are much more likely to become susceptible to infection than younger adults going though a similar situation. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
Jury Delivers Verdict in Salmonella Trial

Jury Delivers Verdict in Salmonella Trial

AP (Sep. 19, 2014) A federal jury has convicted three people in connection with an outbreak of salmonella poisoning five years ago that sickened hundreds of people and was linked to a number of deaths. (Sept. 19) Video provided by AP
Powered by NewsLook.com
How The 'Angelina Jolie Effect' Increased Cancer Screenings

How The 'Angelina Jolie Effect' Increased Cancer Screenings

Newsy (Sep. 19, 2014) Angelina's Jolie's decision to undergo a preventative mastectomy in 2013 inspired many women to seek early screenings for the disease. Video provided by Newsy
Powered by NewsLook.com
The Cost of Ebola

The Cost of Ebola

Reuters - Business Video Online (Sep. 18, 2014) As Sierra Leone prepares for a three-day "lockdown" in its latest bid to stem the spread of Ebola, Ciara Lee looks at the financial implications of fighting the largest ever outbreak of the disease. Video provided by Reuters
Powered by NewsLook.com

Search ScienceDaily

Number of stories in archives: 140,361

Find with keyword(s):
Enter a keyword or phrase to search ScienceDaily for related topics and research stories.

Save/Print:
Share:

Breaking News:
from the past week

In Other News

... from NewsDaily.com

Science News

Health News

Environment News

Technology News



Save/Print:
Share:

Free Subscriptions


Get the latest science news with ScienceDaily's free email newsletters, updated daily and weekly. Or view hourly updated newsfeeds in your RSS reader:

Get Social & Mobile


Keep up to date with the latest news from ScienceDaily via social networks and mobile apps:

Have Feedback?


Tell us what you think of ScienceDaily -- we welcome both positive and negative comments. Have any problems using the site? Questions?
Mobile: iPhone Android Web
Follow: Facebook Twitter Google+
Subscribe: RSS Feeds Email Newsletters
Latest Headlines Health & Medicine Mind & Brain Space & Time Matter & Energy Computers & Math Plants & Animals Earth & Climate Fossils & Ruins